Lecture - General Microbiology PMB/MCB 112 Kathleen Ryan,...

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PMB/MCB 112 General Microbiology Kathleen Ryan, Mary Wildermuth MWF 11-12, 101 Barker Hall
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Exam dates: 1) Friday October 8 during class time 2) Monday November 8 during class time 3) Monday, December 13, 11:30 am-2:30 pm Grading policy: 50 pts for each of 2 midterms 100 pts for comprehensive final exam 25 pts for homework assignments 25 pts for section participation Discussion format: discuss problem sets, research articles, and questions from lectures bSpace has the official course web site, to which anyone enrolled has access
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Microorganisms : a diverse group of organisms that exist as free- living single cells or cell clusters. A single microbial cell can grow, generate energy, and reproduce independently of other cells. Microorganisms include 1) small free-living eukaryotes including algae, fungi, and protists 2) Bacteria 3) Archaea Some people include viruses, which are not cells and cannot reproduce outside of a host cell. This class will focus on the BACTERIA and will introduce you to the ARCHAEA . Bacteria and Archaea look alike at first glance, but they are very different at the molecular level and have a mixture of bacterial and eukaryotic properties
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Robert Hooke built a compound microscope that allowed him to see and document organisms and features of organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye He published his observations in a best-selling book, Micrographia , in 1665
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cells to refer to compartments in a thin slice of cork, because they reminded him of the cells in a monastery Cork is composed of rigid plant cell walls that remain intact after the tissue is dead. The compartments are ~20 µm across. Hooke’s microscope gave
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2011 for the course C 112 taught by Professor Ryan during the Fall '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Lecture - General Microbiology PMB/MCB 112 Kathleen Ryan,...

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