Lect15-KR - Microbial energetics I PMB/MCB 112 October 4,...

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Microbial energetics I PMB/MCB 112 October 4, 2010
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Overview of metabolism
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Fermentation vs. Respiration How is ATP generated? How is redox balance maintained in the cell? (in other words, what happens to NADH?) What happens to the C atoms in glucose?
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When cells conserve energy, what form does it take? Proton gradient across cytoplasmic membrane High-energy compounds that are used to power unfavorable chemical reactions
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In catabolism, electrons are extracted from food molecules and transferred to electron carriers NAD + , NADP + , and FAD The reduced forms can then donate electrons to electron transport chains, to make a proton gradient, or to biosynthetic reactions
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How do bacteria conserve energy derived from nutrients? It depends on 1) energy source or electron donor, and 2) whether an exogenous electron acceptor is available 1) Energy (electrons or photons) can come from organic carbon source (animals, chemoorganotrophs) light (plants, phototrophs) inorganic electron donors (chemolithotrophs) 2) When an exogenous electron acceptor is present, electrons can be passed down an electron transport chain to a final acceptor (O 2 for us, other possibilities for bacteria) Regardless of the electron acceptor, this process is called respiration If no exogenous electron acceptor is absent, cells must obtain energy by fermentation
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Chemoorganotrophs get their carbon and electrons from the same source Some of the carbs are used for synthesis of macromolecules, while
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2011 for the course C 112 taught by Professor Ryan during the Fall '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Lect15-KR - Microbial energetics I PMB/MCB 112 October 4,...

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