Lec39_Nutrients_and_Eutrophication

Lec39_Nutrients_and_Eutrophication - Lecture 39 Nutrients...

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Lecture 39 Nutrients and Eutrophication * Phytoplankton : small free-floating aqautic plants* Periphyton : attached or benthic algae Macrophytes : rooted, vascular aquatic plants Zooplankton : small weakly swimming aquatic animals** ** * The phytoplankton pandorina morum . For photographs of other phytoplankton visit the web page: http://web.uvic.ca/~h2o/katy2.htm ** Zooplankton: http://www.geocities.com/mikblik/plankton.html
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nnouncements Announcements i l E St t Th d M 6 t 10 00 AM Final Exam Starts on Thursday, May 6 at 10:00 AM Questions will go out via email at 10:00 AM ue next Monday (May 10) before 5:00 pm Due next Monday (May 10) before 5:00 pm email submissions are OK Include ALL of your work (plots, code, conclusions, equations etc.) Meet on May 5 for Project Presentations? Time?
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Class Objectives • Understand the mechanisms that cause trophication eutrophication • Learn which forms of nutrients are readily assimilated by plants • Understand the concept of a "limiting nutrient" • Know the significance of N:P ratios We will develop models of plant growth and hosphorous in a later class phosphorous in a later class
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Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems have ndamentally different physical environments fundamentally different physical environments Basic Properties of Water and Air that Influence Ecosystem Processes Property Water Air Ratio water:air Oxygen concentration (ml L -1 ) 7.0 209.0 1:30 yg ( Density (kg L -1 ) 1.000 0.0013 800:1 Viscosity (cP) 1.0 0.02 50:1 Heat capacity (cal L -1 ( ū C) -1 ) 1000.0 0.31 3000:1 fu i t s -1 Diffusion coefficient (mm s ) Oxygen 0.00025 1.98 1:8000 Carbon dioxide 0.00018 1.55 1:9000
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Aquatic plants have No physical support structures Small size to maximize diffusion rates Rapid reproduction to cope with water mixing and grazing
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Reynolds number = UL Where L = length U = velocity kinematic viscosity(m 2 ) = kinematic viscosity(m /s)
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Size determines feeding strategy Small organisms can’t swim: Depend on diffusion Large cells can sink or float: Move vertically Medium-sized organisms can filter-feed (e.g., clams) Large organisms can swim: Can chase prey
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What limits marine production? • Water? (no) trong contrast with terrestrial systems, where water Strong contrast with terrestrial systems, where water is the dominant limiting factor O (no) CO 2 ? (no) –CO 2 -bicarbonate-carbonate equilibrium supplies CO 2 ight? (always at depth) • Light? (always at depth) • Nutrients? (usually)
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Coastal oceans and estuaries • More nutrient-rich (compared to the deep ocean) loser to terrestrial inputs Closer to terrestrial inputs • Benthic decomposition more important ess time for decomposition to occur in water – Less time for decomposition to occur in water • Often nitrogen-limited – Perhaps due to denitrification in sediments
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Lakes • Intermediate between oceans and land elagic zone functions like ocean Pelagic zone functions like ocean – Littoral zone is like wetland a wetland is an environment "at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems. ..and truly aquatic systems. ..making them different from each yet highly dependent on both" (Mitsch & Gosselink, 1986). In essence, wetlands are ecotones.
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2011 for the course ENE 804 taught by Professor Hashsham,s during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Lec39_Nutrients_and_Eutrophication - Lecture 39 Nutrients...

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