Sept_14 - One Electron vs Multi Electron Atoms In one electron atoms all the orbitals of the same principal shell n have the same energy or are

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One Electron vs. Multi Electron Atoms In one electron atoms, all the orbitals of the same principal shell n have the same energy or are degenerate In multi electron atoms, the subshells all have different energies but the orbitals in a subshell are degenerate
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Electron spin A fourth quantum number is associated with the electron, called electron spin m s = +½ or –½ m s does not depend on any of the other quantum numbers. An electron generates a magnetic field due to its spin. The different values of electron spin represent two different orientations of this magnetic field
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Pauli Exclusion Principle “In a given atom no two electrons can have the same set of four quantum numbers (n, l, m l , and m s )” A given atomic orbital is defined by the three orbital quantum numbers n, l , m l The electron can have m s of +½ or - ½ This means each atomic orbital can contain two electrons, each with a different value of m s but the same values of n, l , m l
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2011 for the course CHEM 154 CHEM 154 taught by Professor Yang during the Spring '10 term at The University of British Columbia.

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Sept_14 - One Electron vs Multi Electron Atoms In one electron atoms all the orbitals of the same principal shell n have the same energy or are

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