Gurr - Accommodation or Activism “There is in this world no such force as the force of a person determined to rise The human soul cannot be

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Unformatted text preview: Accommodation or Activism “There is in this world no such force as the force of a person determined to rise. The human soul cannot be permanently chained.” -W.E.B. Dubois Subject Area(s): African American History, Political Philosophy, United States History Overview: Students will analyze the philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois in an effort to distinguish who had a more appropriate strategy for equal political and economic rights for African Americans. The unit is designed to be easily modified for use for students of varying abilities. Essential Understanding: Students will identify the differences between both prominent and African American men and what rationale they had for their beliefs. They will use this context knowledge to determine who had the more effective philosophy. Essential Questions: How can accommodation and activism be effective in bringing about change? Which is more effective? CT Standards: Historical thinking, Applying History, Places and Regions, Economic System, Economic Interdependence, Historical Perspective Objectives: • The students will use historical evidence from primary sources to support their position. • The students will apply knowledge to current issues and make connections to historical knowledge. • The students will be able to identify the historical perspectives of both Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois as a way to understand the social economic stations of African Americans at the turn of the 19 th century. • The students will practice effective collaboration, consensus and oral communication to determine their position on the viability of Activism versus Accommodation. Materials Needed: Handouts attached, computer/internet access Suggested Activities/Procedures: Day 1: Activism v. Accommodation (Designed for a 40-50 minute period) 1. Students are handed a KWL sheet upon entering class and are asked to complete #1. 2. Class is shown either a segment of Roots or asked to read a current event article (i.e. types of protest relating to the issue of rights for Tibetan Buddhists in light of Olympics in China) Two articles are attached as examples or for use. 3. Class discussion (probing for understanding): Suggested questions include • What is the issue or situation that is causing conflict? • How are people reacting to this issue? • Are people taking a stance on this issue? How so? What methods are they using? It might be in the best interest of the students to have a peer volunteer to record class answers on the board. 4. Teacher explains the accommodation and activism by writing the definitions on the board and students asked which methods found in the articles or video fit under each category 4. Class is asked to complete #2 on KWL 5. Explain to class that although slavery has been abolished 1890 African Americans are still considerably poorer than whites. What could be a solution to gaining equal social standing? Two leaders developed different methods to again equality. Explain that Dubois stood for political action to seek equality and equality....
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2011 for the course ASTU 150 taught by Professor Wu during the Spring '10 term at The University of British Columbia.

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Gurr - Accommodation or Activism “There is in this world no such force as the force of a person determined to rise The human soul cannot be

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