Extreme Advertising pushes envelope

Extreme Advertising pushes envelope - Gotcha! Ads push the...

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Gotcha! Ads push the envelope As more companies embrace 'guerrilla' tactics to sell products, cities groan and consumers chuckle. August 17, 2004: 5:25 PM EDT By Krysten Crawford, CNN/Money staff writer NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Recently in New York, there was a sight so jarring even the city's jaded commuters took notice: a throng of scantily clad men and women in front of Grand Central Terminal, flashing underwear with "Booty Call" emblazoned on the backside. Pedestrians and car drivers whipped out digital cameras. Workers in nearby highrises looked on from office windows. Photos posted on the Internet soon drew viewers from all over the world. The skivvy sighting wasn't about self-expression. It was part of an orchestrated campaign by New York Health and Racquet Club to promote a butt-building class for J. Lo wannabes. "It was fantastic," said J. Travis, brand manager for New York Health and Racquet Club. Like a lot of companies, the regional sports club has discovered there's a cheaper and perhaps more effective way to reach consumers than the typical television ad or radio spot. Called "guerrilla marketing," the idea is to catch increasingly finicky and jaded consumers unaware through highly unconventional -- and sometimes shocking -- means, including blanketing city landmarks with stickers of a company logo or using graffiti to
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Extreme Advertising pushes envelope - Gotcha! Ads push the...

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