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EVPP 110 Lecture - Life - Tour of the Kingdoms of Life - Student - Fall 2010

EVPP 110 Lecture - Life - Tour of the Kingdoms of Life - Student - Fall 2010

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Life: A Tour of the Kingdoms of Life EVPP 110 Lecture Dr. Largen
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iClicker Question #1 How many kingdoms of life currently exist? A. 1 B. 2 C. 3 D. 6 E. 7
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iClicker Question #2 How many Domains of life currently exist? A. 1 B. 2 C. 3 D. 6 E. 7
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Kingdom Archaebacteria
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Kingdom Archaebacteria Archaebacteria “ancient” bacteria prokaryotic cells some are “extremophiles” methanogens halophiles (salt lovers) thermophiles (heat lovers) psychrophiles (live at or near freezing point) xerophiles (live in near absence of water) acidophiles (live in 0-5 pH)
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Figure 27.14 Extreme halophiles (Campbell & Reece) Extreme halophiles “Salt-loving” Halophiles Great Salt Lake, UT Salt water evaporating ponds, San Francisco Bay, Halococcus sp.
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Figure 27.1 “Heat-loving” prokaryotes (Campbell & Reece) Heat-loving” Thermophiles
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Colony of bacteria thriving in a bloc of  ice from the Antarctic “Cold-loving” Psychrophiles
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Methanogens were found living in young volcanic deposits, both  hot and cold, on the Ploskii Tolbachik volcano, Russia Methanogens
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Deinococcus radiodurans Thriving in the presence of radioactivity
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Acidophiles Ferroplasma acidophilum Acidic outflow of a California gold mine
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Deinococcus peraridilitoris Atacama Desert, Chile Thriving in the absence of water - Xerophiles
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Solving environmental problems with the help of Archaea production of secreted polymers considered as raw material for biodegradable plastics aid for use in oil exploration efforts enzyme that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in industrial wastewater, producing only O 2 + H 2 O as byproducts cold- and heat- adapted proteins detergents that allow for efficient washing in cold water pectinases that act at lower temperatures in processing of fruit juices, cheeses polymer-degrading enzymes could be used in paper industry and other bioremediation efforts
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Solving environmental problems with the help of Archaea methane generators (methanogens) capacity as clean and inexpensive energy sources methane metabolizers could be used to reduce GHG methane emissions from landfills show promise in generating electricity from waste products removing radioactive metals from the environment efficiently processing biomass into biofuels like ethanol - continued
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Kingdom Eubacteria
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Kingdom Eubacteria Shapes Modes of nutrition Structural features
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Kingdom Eubacteria Shapes spherical cocci (coccus) helical (spiral) spirilla (helical) vibrios (comma) spirochetes (curved) rod-like bacilli (bacillus)
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Domain Bacteria – I n YOUR Life “Strep” throat Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes - continued
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