What is an argument

What is an argument - 9-7-2010Knowledge reality nature...

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Unformatted text preview: 9-7-2010Knowledge reality nature Assignment 1What is an argument? An argument is when two parties develop a well thought out and precise set of reasons to defend a case that they cannot agree upon. Many misuse the word argument for describing bickering or fighting between two people who don’t agree on matter. An argument in the formal sense of the word is like a debate where you prepare a defense against your opponent. The object is not to disagree and clash heads but try to persuade the other party to accepting your reasoning. The best example I can think of to describe an argument is a court case. Two parties, a defense and prosecution, prepare logical statements and concise evidence in order to establish that their side is correct. They develop their cases with premises to either prove the innocence or guilt of the defense. From these premises if the argument has been correctly presented then a conclusion can easily be drawn up as to whether a person is innocent or guilty. Two kids fighting over whether their favorite dinosaur is the best usually doesn’t follow the guidelines of being an argument. Both kids try to make a case but their premises don’t involve logic most likely they revolve around inflated opinions. Neither kid will try to present their side proving they are right they most likely will bicker over the other person being wrong for example: pterodactyls are the best because they could fly out of nowhere and eat you; no they can’t because pterodactyls are stupid and probably couldn’t fly well. Both parties took different opposing sides but neither made factual citations backed with any sort of proof it’s mostly hearsay. What criteria do we use to evaluate arguments?There are two main criteria for the basis of an argument: its premises and its conclusion. From identifying and dissecting these two things one can evaluate an argument....
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2011 for the course HPL hpl 112 taught by Professor Gitsoulis during the Spring '10 term at Stevens.

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What is an argument - 9-7-2010Knowledge reality nature...

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