Political Culture 1824

Political Culture 1824 - P olitical Cultu re in America...

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Political Culture in America (1824- 1844) I. Election of 1824 A. Monroe did not choose anyone to be his successor (presidents previously made it clear who should succeed them and the public voted accordingly) 1. Now a political free for all - Jackson, John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford, Henry Clay 2. No one received a majority of the electoral votes, but Jackson received the popular vote 3. Election then moved to the House (between Jackson and Adams) a) Clay urged his supporters in the House to vote for Adams -- Adams won and Clay was appointed Secretary of the State (known as the “corrupt bargain”) II. Election of 1828: Greater Interest in Politics, An Expanded Electorate A. Andrew Jackson’s (1767-1845) Rise to Power 1. Jacksonian Ideology a) Background: largest amount of people eligible to vote seen in any of the elections, definite widening of the franchise (1) Followers called themselves Democratic Republicans (vs. the Nation- al Republicans) b) link egalitarian ideals of the era with old republican virtue -- moral
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  • Fall '10
  • ROBERTS
  • John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, A. Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, laissez faire attitude, link egalitarian ideals

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Political Culture 1824 - P olitical Cultu re in America...

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