is1_Unit1 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Who Is the Emergency Manager? Using the Stage Manager Model Michael J. Penner, an emergency manager from Olathe, Kansas, uses the following analogy to describe the chaos created by a disaster for which people are not prepared: Disasters demand near-instant assemblage of a large cast of players and steamer trunks full of props. Dragged along with this hastily assembled troupe are the burdensome baggage of standard operating procedures, administrative guidelines, and emergency operations plans—each unique to the responding actors and usually not fully understood by any. He goes on to say how the community (the audience) has high and sometimes unrealistic expectations at such times, even as the media (the arc lights) illuminate the scene for all (literally the world) to see. When the disaster is over, he adds, it is hoped that the responders (the cast) will get favorable reviews for their efforts. The Emergency Manager 1-1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Unit One: Emergency Management: Setting the Scene Emergency Manager as Stage Manager Admittedly, this is not a good way to handle an event. But it is far too often what occurs. As the emergency manager in your community, state, or tribal area, you are a stage manager, as well as a producer and a director—all rolled into one. You are a key player in ensuring a well-executed performance. ...As Producer The emergency manager is responsible for coordinating the plans of the various components of the emergency management system—fire and police, emergency medical services, public works, volunteers, and other groups contributing to the community’s management of emergencies. This is the producer role, as Penner views it. As the producer, we (emergency managers) can ensure that we’ve reserved the proper theater and that all of its facilities are in working order, that all legal documents are well prepared, signed and up to date, that we’ve cast the proper players, and that a budget is in place big enough to pull it all off. ...As Stage Director As the emergency manager, you are also the stage director, but you must understand your relationship to the rest of the cast. The emergency manager is not the main actor. During a disaster, the emergency manager helps manage the application of resources that other managers control. A fire chief, a police chief, a public works director, and a medical services coordinator are emergency response managers who control resources. The emergency manager does not replace them or usurp their jobs. The emergency manager helps these other managers apply their resources wisely and in a coordinated way. The emergency manager is a stage manager, producer, and director. 1-2 The Emergency Manager
Background image of page 2
Unit One: Emergency Management: Setting the Scene …Not the Lead Actor In the Stage Manager Model, it matters not whether the lead actor is the City Manager, the County Administrator, the Mayor, the Public Safety Director, the Fire Chief, the Police Chief, the Public Works Director or any other player. The emergency manager’s role remains the same—setting and maintaining the stage.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/21/2011 for the course FEMA 001 taught by Professor None during the Spring '10 term at Thomas Edison State.

Page1 / 18

is1_Unit1 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online