is1_Unit3 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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What Is Mitigation? As you learned in Unit One, the four phases of emergency management are mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This unit focuses on mitigation. But what is mitigation? FEMA’s Guide for All-hazard Emergency Operations Planning talks about mitigation in the following terms: Mitigation actions involve lasting, often permanent, reduction of exposure to, probability of, or potential loss from hazard events. They tend to focus on where and how to build. Examples include : the zoning and building code requirements for rebuilding in high-hazard areas; flood plain buyouts; and analyses of flood plain and other hazard-related data to determine where it is safe to build in normal times, to open shelters in emergencies, or to locate temporary housing in the aftermath of a disaster. The Emergency Manager 3-1
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Unit Three: Mitigation Mitigation can also involve educating businesses and the public on simple measures they can take to reduce loss or injury, like fastening bookshelves, water heaters, and file cabinets to walls to keep them from falling during earthquakes. Mitigate Before the Disaster From examining this statement, it is apparent that mitigation involves a range of activities. Ideally, these will occur before the disaster. Many of these mitigation activities are not within the direct control of the emergency manager. But that does not mean that you have no role in mitigation. On the contrary, as we will see, there’s a lot for the emergency manager to do to make sure the community engages in mitigation efforts. In this unit we will look at three aspects of mitigation: 1. 2. 3. Hazard identification and vulnerability analysis The role of the emergency manager in mitigation Various mitigation strategies Hazard Identification Let’s begin by defining what we mean by a hazard. It is a natural or man-made event or situation that can cause or create a serious negative impact on the community. It can even lead to a disaster. A hazard can cause the full range of natural disasters, major man-made incidents, and resource crises that become the concern of the entire community, not only emergency management personnel. 3-2 The Emergency Manager
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Unit Three: Mitigation It would be ideal if your community were prepared for all types of hazards. However, in most cases it is not practical to be prepared for all types of hazards, since some may never occur in your community. For example, if you lived in the Midwest, it would be impractical to focus preparedness on hurricanes, as the probability of one reaching the Midwest is very low. Instead, you would focus on tornadoes. These are weather-related hazards. But what about the hazards associated with our 21st-century lifestyle : chemical spills, ecological disasters, explosions, major transportation accidents? Mitigation means addressing both sets of hazards, different as they are in many respects.
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This note was uploaded on 01/21/2011 for the course FEMA 001 taught by Professor None during the Spring '10 term at Thomas Edison State.

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is1_Unit3 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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