is1_Unit4 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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What Is Preparedness? While mitigation can make communities safer, it does not eliminate risk and vulnerability for all hazards. Therefore, jurisdictions must be ready to face emergency threats that have not been mitigated away. Since emergencies often evolve rapidly and become too complex for effective improvisation, a government can successfully discharge its emergency management responsibilities only by taking certain actions beforehand. This is preparedness. Preparedness involves establishing authorities and responsibilities for emergency actions and garnering the resources to support them. A jurisdiction must assign or recruit staff for emergency management duties and designate or procure facilities, equipment, and other resources for The Emergency Manager 4-1
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Unit Four: Preparedness carrying out assigned duties. This investment in emergency management requires upkeep. The staff must receive training, and the facilities and equipment must be maintained in working order. To ensure that the jurisdiction’s investment in emergency management personnel and resources can be relied upon when needed, there must be a program of tests, drills, and exercises. A key element of preparedness is the development of plans that link the many aspects of a jurisdiction’s commitment to emergency management. In this unit, we will examine key elements of an emergency operations plan and then take a look at the equipment, supplies, and personnel required to put the plan into action. The Emergency Operations Plan The emergency operations plan (EOP) is at the center of comprehensive emergency planning. This plan spells out the scope of activities required for community response. It needs to be more than just a dust-collecting document you and others have spent hours writing. It needs to be a living document that accurately describes what the community can realistically do. The EOP allows your community to respond to a threat and engage in short-term recovery, the first step toward long-term recovery. Because response activities are time-sensitive, planning is critical and will help promote a more effective response. Your EOP needs to be flexible enough that it will be of value in any emergency, even those you may not have fully foreseen. In a sense, the all-hazards plan provides your community an emergency management “bottom line” that offers confidence in the jurisdiction’s ability to handle an event. A key element of preparedness is the development of plans. 4-2 The Emergency Manager
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Unit Four: Preparedness What the Plan Is Not Before getting any more deeply into what the EOP is, it might be helpful to say what it is not. It would be wrong to oversimplify and give the impression that effective emergency management hinges on only the EOP.
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is1_Unit4 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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