is1_Unit5 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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In Unit Four, you learned how to plan for an emergency. The true test of the plan is how the community actually responds in time of emergency. In this unit, you will learn the basic stages of response. You will also learn the steps in activating the emergency operations center (EOC) and in processing the information that passes in and out of the EOC. Finally, you will learn about damage assessment to help you determine the situations and allocate the required resources. The Emergency Manager 5-1
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Unit Five: Response Stages of Response There are five stages of response to an emergency or disaster: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Alerting and notification Warning Protecting the citizens and property Providing for the public welfare Restoration The length of each stage depends upon the emergency situation. For example, the alerting or notification stage for a flood or hurricane may be several days. In some cases there is less time before the onset of a disaster. For a tornado or explosion it may be a matter of minutes. Let’s examine each stage of response in more detail. 1. Alerting and Notification Some disasters, such as a hurricane, a winter storm, or a large- scale flood are slow in developing. With the excellent and almost instantaneous communications we have today, the likelihood of citizens’ being unaware of these slowly developing events is unlikely. The constant, up-to-the-minute publicity the media gives these events is part of the alert and notification. Public officials need to notify two groups: the general public and emergency response personnel who will respond. During this period, emergency responders are primarily on a stand-by basis. There are three actions the public needs to take at this time: keep themselves informed of the progress of the threat; take preparatory actions such as getting ready for an evacuation or stockpiling essential resources; and be ready to take more specific steps if public officials order them. In most situations like this, radio and television will be a chief way to alert the general public. But this notification should occur according to the emergency plan. While you will have no control over what the media will say in general about the potential event, you do have control over the specific emergency preparedness information you want them to convey 5-2 The Emergency Manager
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Unit Five: Response to the public. Your plan should state the kinds of emergency information the public needs at different times. Your previous contacts with the media will help you work together during this time. 2. Warning The second phase is warning. Some events occur with little or no lead time for alert and notification. In these instances, things happen so fast that the best public officials can do is to warn the public of impending danger. This would be the case if there were a hazardous chemical spill at a local facility with an immediate threat to all of or a portion of the community.
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is1_Unit5 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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