is1_Unit6 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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Recovery: The Final Phase Recovery includes activities necessary to restore the jurisdiction to normal. Recovery activities are classified as short-term and long-term. During response, the jurisdiction takes emergency action to restore vital functions while instituting protective measures against further damage or injury. Short-term recovery is immediate and tends to overlap with response. The jurisdiction restores interrupted utility services, re-establishes transportation routes, and shores up or demolishes severely damaged buildings. Additionally, there may be a need to provide food and shelter for those displaced by the disaster. Although called short-term, some of these activities may last for weeks. The Emergency Manager 6-1
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Unit Six: Recovery Long-term recovery may involve some of the same activities, but it may continue for a number of months, sometimes years, depending on the severity and extent of the damage sustained. For example, it may include the complete redevelopment of damaged areas. The goal is for the community to return not only to its pre-emergency condition but to an improved state. This is an ideal time to implement new mitigation measures so that the community is better prepared to deal with future threats and does not leave itself vulnerable to the same setbacks as before. Helping the community to take new mitigation steps is one of your most important roles during the recovery phase. You will also be your community’s liaison with state and federal assistance program officials. In addition, you will have to keep track of the myriad of other tasks associated with your daily position as the emergency management coordinator. If you are new to the job, conduct an interview with local officials who were in office at the time of a disaster and ask them about the recovery effort. If you live where there has not been a recent major disaster, review the recovery needs after a major fire or some other event that caused significant losses in the community. Another possibility is to visit a neighboring jurisdiction that has had a disaster, talk to the emergency manager and get an idea of the recovery issues that jurisdiction faced. Recovery Assistance For the majority of disasters, local communities are able to provide the assistance needed for recovery. However, for a major disaster, it may be necessary to obtain assistance from the state or federal government. Therefore, you must be prepared to request outside aid if a major disaster occurs. 6-2 The Emergency Manager
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Unit Six: Recovery Documentation The most common reason for failure to obtain federal assistance is lack of adequate documentation. Documenting a disaster simply means providing evidence of what happened. Photographs of the damage provide irrefutable evidence. Take pictures of the damage, the repair work, and completed restorations.
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is1_Unit6 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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