is1_Unit7 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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Daily Operations Throughout this course we have examined your various roles and what they entail. We have frequently referred to your role as coordinator, using the analogy of the stage manager. The research we discussed in Unit Two pointed out that the successful emergency manager displays professionalism by integrating and coordinating the activities of other people and organizations, even if resources are few. Given that emergency management is the coordination of an organized or systematic effort to mitigate against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an emergency, how does that translate into your daily tasks? You spend the majority of your time preparing for and mitigating possible emergencies. How well you manage the tasks associated with these activities will significantly affect how well the community will respond to and recover from an emergency. The Emergency Manager 7-1
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Unit Seven: Managing the Program In this unit we will look at some of the management functions of daily operations. While these tasks are not as glamorous or thrilling as the high-adrenaline responses during an emergency, your community’s ability to respond is affected by your careful management of these functions.  Staffing your office—with full-time paid, part-time paid, or volunteer staff  Financial planning—the processes of developing a budget, accounting for expenses, and reporting your budget and expenses for the community  Training—for yourself, your staff, citizens, and other performing emergency management roles Ask yourself:  How much of my time will this take? Do I have staff to assist with these?  How much money will it take to accomplish these tasks? How will I account for the funds? What is the most effective way to report accomplishments?  Does anyone, including myself, need training? Can I mentor others to help me with these tasks? Typical Nonemergency Duties Obviously, what you do on a day-to-day basis will depend on various circumstances and factors. But such factors as your geographical location, the size of your jurisdiction, its disaster history, and the official support you enjoy as reflected in your budget and staff size will largely define your job. In the previous units, we have addressed the tasks and functions that are part of the emergency manager’s job. Let’s summarize some typical duties. As you read through this unit, think about the impact of staffing, financial planning, and training on each of these tasks. The following is checklist of typical duties: 7-2 The Emergency Manager
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Unit Seven: Managing the Program 9 Conduct a hazard analysis of the jurisdiction 9 Cooperate with local officials to develop a hazard mitigation program to eliminate or reduce potential hazards 9 Assist local government departments and community organizations in developing emergency plans and capabilities 9 Help industry develop industrial emergency plans and capabilities supporting local government plans 9
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is1_Unit7 - At the end of this unit you will be able to:...

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