7 - BIO 311C Fall 2010 Lecture 7 Friday 10 Sept 2010 1...

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BIO 311C Fall 2010 Lecture 7 – Friday 10 Sept 2010 1
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-Cells that contain flagella generally have only one or a very few flagella. -Flagella are typically very long, sometimes much longer than the length of the cell. -Flagella generally move with a whip-like motion to propel the cell through water or move water past the cell. External Appearance of Flagella A single-celled (unicellular) eukaryotic organism that contains two flagella. 10 µm 2
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-Cells that contain cilia often have many cilia. -Cilia are typically much shorter than the length of the cell. -Cilia generally move in synchrony , with a beating motion, to propel the cell through water or to move water past the cell. The synchronous beating is rather like the coordinated use of oars in rowing of a boat by a racing crew. External Appearance of Cilia A single-celled (unicellular) organism that is covered with cilia. From textbook Fig. 28.11, p. 584. Most kinds of human cells contain a single cilium projecting from the cell. In typical human cells it does not beat, and its function in is only now becoming well understood.
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Many kinds of eukaryotes contain cells with flagella or cilia. No kind of cell contains both. Plant cells do not contain flagella or cilia. unicellular organism that contains two flagella unicellular organism that contains many cilia 4
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Microtubules can occur individually as they do in the mitotic spindle. and They can occur as organized bundles (arrays) as they do in flagella and cilia. 5 They occur in all eukaryotic cells They do not occur in plant cells
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Cross-sectional View of a Flagellum or Cilium 9 microtubule doublets 2 central microtubules plasma membrane dynein (a motor molecule) From textbook Fig. 6.24, p. 115 digramatic representation electron microscope picture (also called an ±electron micrograph²) cilia and flagella appear identical in cross-sectional view 6 This array of microtubules is called a ±9X2 + 2 array².
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Mechanism of movement of Flagella and Cilia a. Energy in the form of ATP is directed to a motor molecule called dynein. b. Energized dynein causes one doublet of microtubules to slide past another doublet. c. Since all microtubule doublets are anchored together at their base, dynein movement causes the entire structure to bend. From textbook Fig. 6.25,
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This note was uploaded on 01/21/2011 for the course BIO 311C taught by Professor Satasivian during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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7 - BIO 311C Fall 2010 Lecture 7 Friday 10 Sept 2010 1...

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