Stem_Cell_Notes - Taken from Vescell Technology TheraVitae Website STEM CELLS Information on Stem Cells and Stem Cell Therapy Stem Cell Fact Sheet What

Stem_Cell_Notes - Taken from Vescell Technology TheraVitae...

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Taken from Vescell Technology TheraVitae Website S TEM C ELLS Information on Stem Cells and Stem Cell Therapy Stem Cell Fact Sheet What are stem cells? Stem cells are special cells that can turn into many different cell types in the body such as heart muscle cells, brain cells, and skin cells. Where do stem cells come from? Stem cells for therapeutic use can be obtained from three potential sources: Embryonic Certain Adult Tissues Umbilical Cord Blood How many kinds of human stem cells are there? There are two kinds of stem cells.[ 1 ] Adult Stem Cells - a supply of stem cells that can multiply when needed to repair adult organs and tissue. Adult stem cells are found in the human body and in umbilical cord blood. The most well known source of adult stem cells in the body is bone marrow but they are also found in many organs and tissues; even in the blood Embryonic Stem Cells - cells found early (less than 2 wks.) in the development of an embryo that can progenerate a developing fetus and ultimately a human baby What are the differences between embryonic, fetal and adult stem cells? All stem cells have the ability to divide into more cells that can either remain a stem cell or begin changing into another kind of cell such as a red blood cell or a nerve cell. The change from stem cell to another kind of cell happens in many steps. After each step, the stem cell's "assignment" [ 2 ] becomes more specialized. 1
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Example of embryonic cell becoming a blood cell: Step 1. Embryonic Stem Cell (Could become anything) Step 2. Adult Stem Cell (Assigned to become a vascular system cell or a kind of nerve cell) Step 3. Vascular Stem Cell (Assigned to become a blood cell or a blood vessel cell) Step 4. Blood Cell Normally, stem cells become more specialized. In humans and other mammals, these developmental events are irreversible, and in this sense, cell development resembles a family tree.
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