Chapter 5 - Gases_Part2 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY CHAPTER 5 GASES...

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CHAPTER 5 – GASES PAGE 5 OF 23 We can use Boyle’s law to find the volume of a gas after a pressure change or the pressure of a gas after a volume change as long as the temperature and the amount of gas remain constant We will write Boyle’s Law in a different way: Since = V α 1 P V = constant (k) x 1 P If 2 quantities are proportional, then one is equal to the other multiplied by a constant V = constant (k) P If we rearrange: PV = constant = PV = k The product of PV is always equal to the same constant For (2) different sets of conditions, we can say: P 1 V 1 = constant = P 2 V 2 P 1 V 1 = k = P 2 V 2 P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 P 1 = Initial Pressure V 1 = Initial Volume P 2 = Final Pressure V 2 = Final Volume The validity of Boyle’s Law can be validated by a series of pressure -volume measurements on a gas sample and plotting them When V is plotted versus P, the result is a curve in the form of a hyperbola When V is plotted versus 1/P, the result is a straight line Equation for a line: y = mx + b y = Volume (V) m = k x = 1/p b = 0 (a constant; 0 in the example) Since Boyle carried out his study, measurements have become more exact Accurate measurements show that that Boyle’ s law only holds true precisely at very low pressures Measurements at higher pressures show that PV is not constant but varies as the pressure is varied Real gases do not follow “ideal conditions” *** A gas that strictly obeys Boyle’s Law is an “ideal gas Example : A cylinder equipped with a movable piston has a volume of 7.25 L under an applied pressure of 4.52
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Chapter 5 - Gases_Part2 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY CHAPTER 5 GASES...

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