ch910 1_Part3 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY CHAPTER 9 & CHAPTER...

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GENERAL CHEMISTRY PAGE 9 OF 22 Example : HCl = Covalent compound = polar covalent bond Experiments show the H-Cl bond is 83% covalent and 17% ionic The Cl atom attracts the bonding electrons more strongly than H Example : Cl 2 = Covalent compound = non-polar covalent compound Bonding electrons are attracted equally to the 2 identical Cl atoms Similar for all diatomic molecules What makes atoms in a molecule have a “pull” for electrons or attract electrons more? Electronegativity (EN) = ability of an atom in a molecules to attract the shared electrons in a covalent bond Fluorine = most electronegative atom The larger the difference in electronegativity, the more polar the bond We can use electronegativity values to predict the polarity of a bond. General guidelines: If the difference in electronegativity between bonded atoms is 0 to 0.4 = non-polar covalent bond If the difference in electronegativity between bonded atoms 0.5 to 1.9 = polar covalent bond If the difference in electronegativity between bonded atoms larger than or equal to 2.0 = ionic bond
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GENERAL CHEMISTRY PAGE 10 OF 22 Lewis Theory Lewis structures = electron dot structures = represents an atom’s valence electrons by dots and
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ch910 1_Part3 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY CHAPTER 9 & CHAPTER...

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