Chapter_14_4E - chapter 14 Body Composition and Nutrition for Sport Learning Objectives Body Composition Find out what tissues of the body

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14 Body Composition and Nutrition for Sport chapter
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Learning Objectives: Body Composition Find out what tissues of the body constitute fat-free mass Discover how densitometry—and other laboratory and field techniques—are used to assess body composition Examine the relationship of relative leanness and fatness to performance in sport Find out what guidelines best determine an athlete’s goal weight
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Learning Objectives: Nutrition and Sport Review the six categories of nutrients and learn what amount of intake is necessary for normally active men and women Discover the roles of carbohydrate, dietary fat, and protein in athletic performance Find out which vitamins and minerals are most important in an athlete’s diet Learn about water and electrolyte balance in athletes (continued)
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Learning Objectives: Nutrition and Sport (continued) To investigate the potential benefits of supplementing carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamins, and minerals for increasing athletic performance Find out what makes up a recommended precompetition meal and how to properly load the muscles with glycogen before an endurance event Learn the value in ingesting carbohydrate during and after endurance exercise and what constitutes the most effective sport drink
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Body Composition in Sport Body composition refers to the chemical composition of the body 1. Chemical model 2. Anatomical model 3. Two-compartment model
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Three Models of Body Composition Adapted, by permission, from J.H. Wilmore, 1992, Body weight and body composition. In Brownell, Rodin, and Wilmore (Eds.) Eating, body weight, and performance in athletes: Disorders of modern society (Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins), 77-93.
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Body Mass Fat mass: the total body mass that is composed of fat Fat-free mass: all body tissues that are not fat, including bone, muscle, organs, and connective tissue
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Body Composition vs. Height and Weight in Athletes Generally, an athlete’s body composition is of greater concern than total body size and weight Standard height and weight tables do not provide accurate estimates of what an athlete should weigh because they do not take into account the composition of the weight An athlete can be overweight according to standardized height and weight tables but be underfat or at optimal fat levels
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Densitometry Body density = body mass ÷ body volume Density of fat-free mass is higher than the density of water Density of fat is lower than the density of water % body fat = (495 ÷ body density) – 450 Key assumptions: 1. The density of each tissue constituting the fat-free mass is known and remains constant 2. Each tissue type represents a constant proportion of the fat-free mass (e.g., bone always represents 17% of the fat-free mass)
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Underwater Weighing Technique to Determine Density of the Body Tom Pantages
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Other Laboratory Techniques to Assess Body Composition Radiography Computed tomography (CT)
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This note was uploaded on 01/22/2011 for the course HSS 396 taught by Professor Jones during the Spring '10 term at University of Louisville.

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Chapter_14_4E - chapter 14 Body Composition and Nutrition for Sport Learning Objectives Body Composition Find out what tissues of the body

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