{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Week 2 - iLab - Week 2 P roject Scope and Schedule i Lab As...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Week 2: Project Scope and Schedule - iLab As the Project Manager for ACME Landscaping & Construction you are moving through your project. Last week, you entered your tasks, this week you are going to schedule the tasks, and next week, you will assign the tasks. But, let's not get ahead of ourselves just yet! Below is a project timeline for the 7 weeks. Notice we will concentrate on the tasks for week 2. View Transcript Here Week 2 Lab Overview Welcome back to the iLab – glad to see you came back for some more MS Project work! OK, let’s get going. We start our ilab this week by using the results of week 1’s iLab. You should make sure to use the posted starting file for week 2 which you will find in Doc Sharing. Once you have it open in MS Project, you will spend this week working on adding the durations to the tasks and then linking them to each other (predecessors). Before we start entering values into our project, let’s discuss what we are doing and why we are doing it. Last week we simply entered our task outline, so what we have is not considered a schedule yet, just an organized task list. We need to now schedule the project. The way we schedule is that we put estimated durations (time) on tasks. This tells MS Project (and the project team too!) how long each task will take. MS Project calculates the durations based on the settings we applied in week 1 and generates a timeline automatically. At this point in the scheduling process, the tasks all have the same start date (1/3/06), so the project duration is only as long as the longest task. We know that project tasks all do not run concurrently (at the same time), so we have to give them an order. This is where the predecessors come into play. In MS Project, we use the predecessor column to enter the IDs of tasks that are required to complete before other tasks can start. There are different types of algorithms that MS Project can calculate, such as: Finish to Start - A Finish-to-Start dependency means that the second task cannot start until the first task has finished. Start to Finish - A Start-to-Finish dependency is the opposite in that the second task cannot finish until the first task starts. Start to Start - Start-to-Start means that the second task cannot start until the first task starts.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern