6 - ORDBM_OODBS

6 - ORDBM_OODBS - Session 6 : Object-Relational Databases...

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Unformatted text preview: Session 6 : Object-Relational Databases Object-Oriented Databases Introduction The need for extensions in Relational Data Model Classification of database systems Introduce extensions to the basic relational model Applications that would benefit from extended relational databases Nested Relations Complex Types and Object Orientation Querying with Complex Types Creation of Complex Values and Objects The Object-Oriented Data Model Object-Oriented Languages Comparison of Object-Oriented and Object-Relational Databases CS585 Fall 2010 Farid Parvini Motivating Example Need for Complex Data Types Traditional database applications in data processing had conceptually simple data types Relatively few data types, first normal form holds Complex data types have grown more important in recent years E.g. Addresses can be viewed as a Single string, or Separate attributes for each part, or Composite attributes (which are not in first normal form) E.g. it is often convenient to store multivalued attributes as-is, without creating a separate relation to store the values in first normal form Applications computer-aided design, computer-aided software engineering multimedia and image databases, and document/hypertext databases . Why Extend Relational Data Model To eradicate the following weaknesses Poor representation of real world conceptual model Usually the relational schema does not correspond to real world entities Difficult to change schema without affecting the applications; e.g., Y2K Semantic overloading The same relation is used to represent entities as well as relationships Poor support for integrity and business rules Fixed number of attributes & all attribute values must be atomic Limited operations Object Oriented Influence Michael Stonebrakers Classification Michael Stonebraker presents this four-quadrant matrix in the book entitled Object-Relational DBMSs: The Next Great Wave This is a classification of both database applications and systems. Lower-Left Quadrant Those application that process simple data and require no query capability e.g. text processors (word, emacs) Information has little internal structure. Document updates are relatively infrequent. Documents are of modest size. Queries are simple string or pattern searches. Upper-Left Quadrant Those application that process simple data and require complex query capability e.g. a typical business application require RDBMS. Information has straightforward and fixed structure. Information collection may be large. Information storage must be reliable....
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6 - ORDBM_OODBS - Session 6 : Object-Relational Databases...

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