Ch_322b_24.12

Ch_322b_24.12 - Enzymes Introduction An enzyme is a protein...

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Enzymes Introduction Enzymes are remarkably structure-specific in their reactions with substrates. Over 100 hundred years ago, Emil Fischer postulated the lock and key hypothesis to explain the ability of enzymes to distinguish !" and # -glycosidic linkages. This hypothesis emphasizes the geometric complementarity of the reacting substrate and the enzyme. enzyme substrate enzyme substrate Fischer Lock and Key Hypothesis An enzyme is a protein that specifically catalyzes some biological process. An enzyme may enhance the rate of a reaction by a factor of 10 6 to 10 12 , which allows reactions to occur at reasonable rates under mild conditions (neutral pH, 35 o C).
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Theory of Enzyme Reactivity Cofactors Many enzymes require a cofactor to be active. The cofactor may be as simple as an ion such as Mg 2+ , or it may be a complex organic molecule. Often the cofactor binds to a specific site activating the enzyme. Enzymes as Catalysts
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Ch_322b_24.12 - Enzymes Introduction An enzyme is a protein...

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