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Name: Class: "Deportation of Polish Jews to Treblinka extermination camp from the ghetto in Siedlce, 1942, occupied Poland." by Unknown is in the public domain. Nazi Germany's 'Euthanasia' Program By The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum 2016 The Nazi Party ruled Germany from 1933-1945 and was led by Adolf Hitler. A key component of Nazi rule was an attempt to “purify” the German race by killing anyone who had “impurities,” which included Jews, Roma (Gypsies), and people with physical or mental disabilities, among others. To achieve this goal, the Nazi government killed 6 million Jews and 5 million others. The Nazi euthanasia program was one of the first programs of mass murder created to achieve their goal. As you read, identify the causes and effects of the Nazi "euthanasia" program. The term “euthanasia” (literally, “good death”) usually refers to the inducement 1 of a painless death for a chronically or terminally ill individual who would otherwise suffer. In the Nazi 2 context, however, “euthanasia” was a euphemism 3 for a clandestine 4 murder program of disabled patients living in institutional settings in Germany and German-annexed territories. 5 The program was Nazi Germany’s first policy of mass murder. Like those who planned the genocide 6 of European Jews, the organizers of the “euthanasia” program imagined a racially pure and productive society and embraced radical strategies to eliminate those who did not fit within their vision. [1] 1. Induce (verb): to bring about; to cause 2. The Nazis were a political party that led Germany from 1933 to 1945, initiated World War II, and under the guidance of Adolph Hitler killed about 11 million Europeans in mass murders. 3. Euphemism (noun): a mild or pleasant word or phrase that is used instead of one that is unpleasant or offensive 4. Clandestine (adjective): marked by or conducted in secrecy 5. Germany “annexed” territories by declaring and bringing them officially under German control. During World War II, Nazi Germany annexed Austria, Belgium, and other parts of central and eastern Europe.

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