Chapter24 - Chapter24-The Origin of Species The theory of...

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Chapter24-The Origin of Species The theory of natural selection began with the observation that plants and animals living in the Galapagos Islands found nowhere else on Earth. Speciation-The process by which one species splits into two or more species. It explains not only differences between species, but also similarities between them. Microevolution-changes over time in allele frequencies in a population. Macroevolution-the broad pattern of evolution over long time spans. 1. The biological species concept emphasizes reproductive isolation a. A species is a group of populations whose members have the potential to interbreed in nature and produce viable, fertile offspring but do not produce viable, fertile offspring with members of other such groups. b. Reproductive- the existence of biological factors (barriers) that impede two species from producing viable, fertile offspring. Hybrids are the offspring of crosses between different species i. Prezygotic barriers (before the zygote) block fertilizations from
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Chapter24 - Chapter24-The Origin of Species The theory of...

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