Journal_of_Krishi_Vigyan_vol_8_issue.pdf - SCIENTISTS JOINED AS LIFE MEMBER OF SOCIETY OF KRISHI VIGYAN 3512019 Y Prabhabati Devi Subject Matter

Journal_of_Krishi_Vigyan_vol_8_issue.pdf - SCIENTISTS...

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Unformatted text preview: SCIENTISTS JOINED AS LIFE MEMBER OF SOCIETY OF KRISHI VIGYAN 3512019. Y. Prabhabati Devi, Subject Matter Specialist, Home Science, Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Chandel, ICAR, Manipur Centre 3522019. Moutusi Dey, Subject Matter Specialist (Horticulture), Uttar Dinajpur Krishi Vigyan Kendra, UBKV Uttar Dinajpur, west Bengal 3532019. Sri Sourav Mondal, Subject Matter Specialist, Plant Protection, Rathindra Krishi Vigyan Kendra ,Visva-Bharati university ,Sriniketan, Birbhum, West Bengal 3542019. Ankita, Subject Matter Specialist (Soil Science), Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand 3552019. Shikha Bathla, Assistant Professor (Home Science), Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Langroya, Shaheed Bhagat Singh Nagar, Punjab. 3562019 J Bhuyan, Scientist, Home Science , Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Mayurbhanj-I, Shamkunta, Odisha. 331 Sr. No. Title CONTENTS Page No. Agronomy 1. Effect of Date of Sowing and Cutting Management on Seed Yield in Berseem 96-100 (Trifolium alexandrinum L.). Ajmair Singh, Rakesh Sharma and Amanpreet Singh 2. Effect of Integrated Nutrient Management on Productivity and Economics of 87-91 Rabi Onion (Allium cepa L). Iqbal Singh Dhillon and Didar Singh 3. Effect of Plant Spacing on the Growth and Yield of Blackgram (Vigna mungo). 101-104 P Veeramani 4. Effect of Planting Geometry and Fertigation Levels on Growth, Yield and 63-69 Quality of Chilli. V N Nandeshwar and S G Bharad 5. Evaluation of Cropping System of Medium Duration Rice Followed by Toria under 81-86 Medium Land Situation. R Bezbaruah and R S Deka 6. Influence of Different Planting Methods and Mulching on Growth and Yield of Spring 149-153 Maize (Zea mays L). Amandeep Kaur and Gurbax Singh Chhina 7. Utility of Vyavasaya Panchangam. 284-290 M Venkataramulu and P Punnarao 8. Water Management through Puddling Techniques. 297-300 K Prasanthkumar, M Saravanakumar and J John Gunasekar 9. Zero-Till Wheat Planting in Rice-Wheat Cropping System. 301-305 Shailendra Singh Kushwah, B S Kasana and S S Bhadauria Agricultural Extension 10. Attitude of Women towards Self Help Groups under Integrated Watershed 19-22 Management Programme M K Bariya, H S Patel, K U Chandravadia, S J Parmar and H C Chodavadia 11. Evaluation of Agronomic Practices based on the Knowledge Level of Small and Big 117-121 Guava growers of Rajasthan State. S R Meena and Y K Sharma 12. Effect of Nutrition Education on Knowledge Level of Farm women. 92-95 Rashmi Limbu, Manisha Arya and Ankita 13. Impact of Trainings and Demonstrations on Promotion of Mushroom Cultivation. 162-165 A Rajkala, S Shobana, M Ashok Kumar and G Alagukannan 14. Information Seeking Behaviour of Opinion Leaders in Hill Region of Uttarakhand. 154-161 Neelam Basera, Neelam Bhardwaj and Arpit Huria 15. Investigation of Socio-Economic Traits of Tibetan Rehabilitants and its relationship to 178-182 their Problems. E K Marbaniang, L Manjunath, V S Yadav, S Sadaqath, K V Natikar, And S S Dolli 326 16. Job Performance of Subject Matter Specialists working in Krishi Vigyan Kendra. S D Sarnaik, P P Bhople, D M Mankarand N M Kale 17. Knowledge Gain through Bee Keeping Training Programme. Bhupender Singh and Surender Singh 18. Knowledge Level of Farmers about Chickpea Production Technology in Nagaur District of Rajasthan. Mahendra Kumar and S R Kumawat 19. Knowledge Level of Farmers about Improved Production Technology of Onion Crops in Sikar District of Rajasthan. Mahesh Choudhary, B L Asiwal and R K Dular 20. Perception and Adoption of Soil Health Cards by Farmers in YSR Kadapa District of Andhra Pradesh. Veeraiah A, Shilpakala V, Ramalakshmi devi S and Ankaiah Kumar K 21. Reasons for Discontinuance of Agricultural Innovations by Farmers in Tarai Region of Uttarakhand. Arpit Huria, V L V Kameswari and Neelam Basera 22. Regression Analysis of Knowledge Level and Socio Economic Impact of Drip Irrigation System with the Selected Characteristics of Drip Owners. . Mahammad Shafi Rupanagudi Shaik , Swati Khandave and Nikitaben Thakor 23. Training Needs of Tribal Farm Women in relation to Improved Animal Husbandry Practices of Chhotaudepur District of Gujarat. B L Dhayal and B M Mehta 24. Tool to Measure Attitude of Postgraduate Scholars towards Extension Service. Naveenkumar, G and Chauhan N B 183-186 306-311 187-190 191-196 225-230 235-242 243-246 274-278 279-283 Agricultural Economics 25. Economic Viability of Crop Diversification in Punjab. 55-62 Raj Kumar and Sangeet 26. Extent of Diversification and Constraints in Adoption of Different Farming Systems in 122-127 Chamba District of Himachal Pradesh. Divya Sharma and Virender Kumar 27. Loan Repayment Behaviour under Nagaland State Cooperative Bank Limited. 203-207 Longma Yanger Pongen, A K Godara and S P Singh 28. Micronutrients Spray on Yield and Economics of Cotton in Rainfed Areas of Prakasam 208-211 district in Andhra Pradesh. Sahaja Deva, G M V Prasada Rao, P Vinayalakshmi, Ch Varaprasada Rao 29. Resource Use Efficiency of Bt Cotton in Hanumangarh District of Rajasthan. 247-251 Vikas, Hari Om Sharma and Mukesh Kumar 30. Study on Marketing Pattern of Chilli Cultivation in Wokha District of Nagaland. 269-273 Nchumthung Murry and James Tsopoe Agricultural Engineering 31. Comparative Study between Solar Dryer and Open Sun dried Tomato under North Plateau Climatic Zone. J Bhuyan, D K Mohanty and D Jayapuri 327 28-33 32. Stem Application Technology with Modified Tools for Management of Sucking Pests in Cotton (Gossypium herbaceum L.). Venkanna Yasa, Bhaskar Rao B and Sreenivas A 33. Studies on Ambient Storage of Lime Juice Concentrate Packed in Sachet. R A Kachhadia, B L Jani, B M Devani and D M Vyas Animal Science and Fisheries 34. Characterization of households of Marginal and Landless Livestock Farmers in Rural Tamil Nadu. K M Sakthivel and Narmatha N 35. Development of Dot-ELISA Technique for Estimation of Milk Progesterone and PregnancyDiagnosis using PVDF Membrane. Ramesh Kumar, Taruna Thakur and R L Prasad 36. Feeding of Concentrate and Green Fodder at an Early Age and its Effects on Growth Rate in Goat Kids. Tejbeer Singh and Manoj Sharma 37. Incidence of Repeat Breeding in cattle at Organized Dairy Farms. Dinesh Mahto and Shobha Rani 38. Line Fishing Methods of the Brahmaputra Valley. Deepjyoti Baruah, Amalesh Dutta and P Pravin 39. Performance of Pekin Ducks and Desi Ducks under Integrated Farming System at Kancheepuram District in Tamilnadu. K Devaki, K Senthilkumar and P R Nisha 264-268 256-263 23-27 43-54 133-136 166-169 197-202 217-220 Horticulture 40. Assessment of Bottle Gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) Varieties for Fruit Yield and Component Traits in Mohali District of Punjab. Munish Sharma, Yashwant Singh and Priyanka Suryavanshi 41. Effect of Plastic Mulch on Growth, Yield and Economics of Chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) under Nimarplains Conditions of Madhya Pradesh. S K Tyagiand G S Kulmi 42. Foliar Fertilization for Enhancing Yield and Fruit Qquality of Apple under Rain-fed Conditions of Mid-Himalayas Sanjeev K Banyal and Ajay K Banyal 43. Marketing Behaviour of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) Growers in Tapi District. P K Modi, P D Verma and S M Chavan 44. Potential of Dry Khirni (Manilkara hexandra Roxb.) Fruits as Nutritional Substitute. Kanak Lata, Sanjay Singh, Raj Kumar and Shakti Khajuria 45. Response of Micronutrient Mixture Application in Banana for Enhanced Growth and Yield Bindu B 5-7 105-108 137-141 212-216 234-234 252-255 Home Science 46. Consumer Acceptance of Household Articles Developed through Recycled Agro textiles. 34-37 Pooja Bhatt, Anita Rani and Sudha Jukaria 328 47. Effect of Processing Techniques on Quality and Acceptability of Bitter Brinjal Pickle. 70-75 Y. Prabhabati Devi 48. Ergonomic Analysis of the Work Environment of Weavers in Manipur. 113-116 Kangjam Victoria Deviand Visalakshi Rajeswari 49. Factors Responsible for Contributing Anxiety among the Working Women in Punjab. 128-132 Shikha Bathla and Shabnam Sharma 50. Peer Victimization among School Children. 221-224 Varsha Saini and Shanti Balda Plant Breeding 51. Assessment of Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum) Varieties for Yield and 8-12 Productivity in Salem District. P S Kavitha, A Sudha and N Sriram 52. Assessment of Improved Variety of Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) Prajwal for Yield and 1 3-18 Economics in Western Parts of Chittoor District of Andhra Pradesh Pedda Nagi Reddy Pocha, M Mallikarjun, G Nirmala Devi and M Reddi Kumar Plant Pathology 53. Assessment of Biocontrol Agents for Management of Nematode Complex Disease in Chillies. K Kavitha and R Latha 54. Integrated Management of Nematode Disease Complex in Tuberose (Polianthes tuberose L) K Kavitha and K Thirukumaran 55. Integrated Management of Panama wilt disease in Banana. Sudha A, Kavitha P S and Sriram N Soil Science 56. Design and Development of an Expert Support System for Fertilizer Calculation. V G Sunil , Berin Pathrose and K Prasanth 57. Effects of Soil Application of Biochar on Soil Health and Productivity of Rice-Wheat Cropping System in Rohtas District of Bihar. Ram Pal 58. Effect of Various Silicon Sources on Nutrient Uptake in Rice. Guntamukkala Babu Rao, Poornima Yadav P I and Elizabeth K Syriac 59. GIS and Remote sensing Approach in Identifying Ground Water Recharge Zones of Cheriyal Watershed. B Meghana1, Ch Rakesh, P karthik, D Girish, Ch Radha Srivalli 60. Water Draft Exceeds the Quantity of Groundwater Recharge: A Case of Yarehalli Micro-Watershed, Davanagere District, Karnataka. Shivaraj S and Naveena K P 329 1-4 170-173 174-177 38-42 109-112 76-80 142-148 291-296 Short Communications 61. Anionic Mishran Supplementation in Pleuriparous Animals. Rakesh Thakur and Vishal Dogra 62. Evaluation of Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) Varieties suited for Off Season Cultivation in Rain Shelters of Kerala. Bindu B 63. Impact of KVK Training Programme on Knowledge Level of Moong Bean Growers. B L Asiwal and L R Balai 64. Performance of Red Gram (Cajanus cajan) under Rain fed Situation in district Mahabubnagar. P S John daniel, V Rajendra Kumar and Bhupender Singh 330 306-309 310-313 314-316 317-319 J Krishi Vigyan 2019, 8 (1) : 1-4 DOI : 10.5958/2349-4433.2019.00059.X Assessment of Biocontrol Agents for Management of Nematode Complex Disease in Chillies K Kavitha and R Latha ICAR-Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Thirupathisaram-629 901, Kanyakumari District (Tamil Nadu) ABSTRACT The experiment on assessment of talc based formulations of Pseudomonas fluorescens 1% WP + Trichoderma viride 1% WP + Paecilomyces lilacinus 1% WP of IIHR, Bangalore and talc based formulations of P fluorescence (Pf1) of TNAU, Coimbatore were used for the evaluation of its efficacy for the management of nematode complex disease in chillies at farmers field. The experiment was conducted in Nainarpalayam village of Vanoor block of Villupuram district at five farmer’s field. The talc based formulation of P fluorescens, T viride and P lilacinus was enriched in farm yard [email protected] 5kg/ha whereas P fluorescens (Pf1) was used @ 2.5 kg/ha for FYM enrichment and seed treatment @ 10g/kg of seed. The results revealed that soil application of mixture of three biocontrol agents viz., P fluorescens + T viride + P lilacinus enriched in FYM efficiently reduced the Fusarium wilt and root knot nematode incidence in chillies than application of single biocontrol agent P fluorescens (Pf1) alone. Key Words: Chilli, Fusarium wilt, Root Knot Nematode, Management. INTRODUCTION Chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) is being grown worldwide as one of the most important vegetable and spice crop for its multipurpose use. In India it is an important cash crop, which is grown for both domestic and export market for vegetable green fruits and for the dry chilli as the spice of commerce. India is the largest producer of chillies in the world followed by China, Pakistan and Mexico. There are many biotic and abiotic factors which are decreasing chilli production. Chilli crop suffers with many fungal, bacterial and viral diseases resulting in huge yield losses. Among these factors the most devastating are fungal nematode complex diseases which lower the yield. The nematode infestation on plants leads to the secondary infection of other soil borne pathogens viz., fungal / bacterial pathogens (Taylor, 1990). Wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. capsici has been found as the most frequently encountered disease problem (Siddiqui and Akhtar, 2007) in chillies. Survey for wilt disease revealed that growing chilli continuously in the same field without crop rotation throughout the year for seed or dry or vegetable purpose will help the pathogen to survive on host (Priya and Mesta, 2018). Root-knot disease caused by Meloidogyne incognita has been found as the most frequently encountered nematode disease and is one of the limiting factors affecting the production of chilli in India. National loss due to nematode pest in chilli was worked out to 12.85 per cent and in monetary terms to the tune of 210 million rupees (Jain et al, 2007). The incidence of wilt varied from 0 to 75 per cent in different states of India (Anonymous, 2005). Wilt caused by Fusarium solani recorded 25 per cent yield loss in Karnataka in black cotton soil (Madhukar and Naik, 2004). In Pakistan Fusarium wilt of chilli causes 15 to 20 per cent yield losses in dry areas (Siddiqui and Akhtar, 2007). Interactions between Meloidogyne spp. and fusarium wilt pathogens has been studied and documented in several host crops (Back et al, 2002). Chemical control of root-knot nematode and fungal pathogens is most efficient method but very Corresponding Author’s Email: [email protected] 1 J Krishi Vigyan 2019, 8 (1) : 1-4 Kavitha and Latha expensive, not sustainable and has adverse effects on human health, ground water and environment. In view of the uneconomical and hazardous effects of pesticides, researchers have focused their attention to adopt biological control of Meloidogyne spp. (Singh and Mathur, 2010). Pseudomonas fluorescence was found effective against root-knot nematodes and soil borne pathogens. Trichoderma viride is also effective against several fungal pathogens (Kapoor et al, 2010) and Meloidogyne spp (AbdAl-Fattah A et al, 2007). Paecilomyces lilacinus is also as a potential biological control agent of Meloidogyne spp (Kiewnick and Sikora, 2006). However, biocontrol agents often are not thought as acceptable alternatives for pesticides. Reasons for this include lack of broad spectrum activity, inconsistent performance in field and slower in action by the bio-control agents when compared with pesticides. One of the strategies for overcoming inconsistent performance is to combine the disease-suppressive activity of two (or more) beneficial bio-agents to manage the nematode complex disease in chillies. As the single bio-agent has not proved effective in the management of nematode induced disease complex, it was proposed to evaluate the combination of nematophagus fungus P. lilacinum with other bio-agents. viz. P. fluorescence and T. viride. In this investigations, On farm testing has been conducted to evaluate the effect of combination of three Bioagents of IIHR, Bangalore viz., T. viride, P. fluorescence and P. lilacinus along with the TNAU P. fluorescence for the management of nematode induced wilt disease of chilli which is caused by Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. capsici . MATERIALS AND METHODS The experimental trial was conducted at Nainarpalayam village of Vanoor block of Villupuram district at five farmer’s field as five replications. Talc based formulations of Pseudomonas fluorescens 1%WP + Trichoderma viride 1% WP + Paecilomyces lilacinus 1% WP obtained from 2 IIHR, Bangalore and Talc based formulations of P fluorescence (Pf1)obtained TNAU, Coimbatore was used for the study purpose. The talc based formulation of IIHR P fluorescens, T viride and P lilacinus were used for enrichment of farm yard manure. One ton of well decomposed FYM was enriched by mixing of each of IIHR P fluorescens, T viride and P lilacinus formulation @ 5kg/ha under shade with optimum moisture of 25 - 30% for a period of 15 d. Once in a week FYM was thoroughly mixed for maximum multiplication and homogenous spread of the microorganisms in the entire lot of FYM. The same procedure was used for the enrichment of FYM with TNAU P fluorescens (Pf1) @ 2.5 kg/ha. This enriched FYM was used for all the experiments. Seed treatment of chillies was done with P fluorescens (Pf1) @ 10g/kg of seed. The treatment details is as follows T1 T2 T3 Seed treatment with P fluorescens (Pf1) @10 g/kg seed + Soil application of P fluorescens (Pf1) @ 2.5 kg/ha enriched in FYM Soil application of IIHR P. fluorescens 1% WP + IIHR T viride 1% WP + IIHR P lilacinus 1% WP each @ 5 kg/ha enriched in FYM Control The observations on percent wilt incidence and nematode gall index were recorded. The number of galls/root system was assessed and assigned a severity scale from 0 to 5 (0=no galls, 1=1‒2, 2=3‒10, 3=11‒30, 4=31‒100, 5=>100 galls per root system) (Taylor and Sasser, 1978) RESULTS AND DISCUSSION It was evident from the present investigation that the soil application of P fluorescens + T viride + P lilacinus recorded lowest incidence of fusarium wilt of 5.6 per cent and nematode gall index of 1.2 whereas by seed treatment with P fluorescens (Pf1) and Soil application of P fluorescens (Pf1) recorded 6.8 per cent fusarium wilt incidence and nematode gall index of 1.2. J Krishi Vigyan 2019, 8 (1) : 1-4 Assessment of Bio Control Agents There was no significant difference between both the treatments on yield and reduction in disease incidence (Table 1). The reduction on the wilt and nematode gall index could be due to the antagonistic activity of P fluorescens and higher activity of defense enzymes in the plants treated with T viride (Umamaheswari et al, 2004). Ranjinikanth et al, 2013 reported that application of T viride, P lilacinus and P flourescens enriched in neem cake was more effective than treatments with individual bio-agents in reducing M incognita population and disease incidence caused by F oxysporum in cauliflower. P lilacinus colonizes the root surface and parasitizes eggs, egg-masses, juveniles and females of Meloidogyne spp. by direct hyphal penetration (Mucksood and Tabriez, 2010). Synergistic effect of Trichoderma sp in combination P.fluorescens treatment, enhanced the biological control of nematodes, leading to greater reduction in nematode population Siddiqui and Shaukat (2004). Adoption of integrated disease management effectively controls dry root rot disease in chillies (Bindu Madhavi and Bhattiprolu,2011) CONCLUSION Soil application of mixture of three biocontrol agents viz., P fluorescens + T viride + P lilacinus enriched in FYM efficiently reduced the Fusarium wilt and root knot nematode incidence in chillies than application of single biocontrol agent P fluorescens (Pf1) alone. The results revealed that adoption of integrated disease management practice would reduce the nematode disease complex and increase the yield in chillies. REFERENCES Abd Al-Fattah, Dababat A and Sikora R A (2007). Use of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride for the Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato. Jordan J Agric Sci 3(3):297-309. Anonymous (2005). Network project on wilt of crops submitted to ICAR. Annual Report, New Delhi. pp 7. Back M A, Haydock P P J and Jenkinson P (2002). Disease complexes involving plant parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. Plant Pathology 51: 683–697. Bindu Madhavi G and Bhattiprolu S L (2011). Integrated disease management of dry root rot of chilli incited by Sclerotium rolfsii. Int J Plant, Anim and Environ Sci 1(2): 31-37. Soil application of combination of formulation of T viride, P fluorescence and Jain R K, Mathur K and Singh R V (2007). Estimation of losses due to Plant Parasitic Nematodes on different P lilacinum was effective in controlling nematode crops in India. Indian J Nematology 37: 219-2...
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