intro-3076-11 - Chapter1 Introduction Reading assignment...

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 Introduction 1-1 Chapter 1 Introduction Computer Networking:,  5 th  edition.  Jim Kurose, Keith Ross Addison-Wesley, 2009  Reading assignment: Chapter 1 Slides: Adopted from K&R
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 Introduction 1-2 Chapter 1: Introduction Our goal:   get “feel” and terminology approach: use Internet as example Overview: what’s the Internet what are the key elements of networks? What controls and manages networks Basics in Intro : Network: physical and  logical  Switching Techniques Performance Protocol Layers
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 Introduction 1-3 What’s the Internet: “nuts and bolts” view millions of connected computing  devices:  hosts = end systems running  network apps Network core: routers:  forward packets (chunks of  data)  communication links fiber, copper, radio, satellite transmission rate =  bandwidth (bps) Internet:  “network of networks” Heterogeneous networks local ISP company network regional ISP router workstation server mobile
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 Introduction 1-4 Cool” internet appliances Web! YouTube Web-enabled toaster + weather forecaster Internet phones: Skype Smart Grid??
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 Introduction 1-5 What’s the Internet: “nuts and bolts” view protocols  control sending, receiving  of msgs e.g., HTTP, email, TCP, IP Internet standards RFC: Request for comments IETF: Internet Engineering Task  Force local ISP company network regional ISP router workstation server mobile
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 Introduction 1-6 What’s the Internet: a service view communication infrastructure  enables distributed applications: Web, email, games, e-commerce, file  sharing communication services provided  to apps: Connectionless unreliable connection-oriented reliable
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 Introduction 1-7 Internet structure: network of networks “Tier-3” ISPs and local ISPs  last hop (“access”) network (closest to end systems) Tier 1 ISP Tier 1 ISP Tier 1 ISP NAP Tier-2 ISP Tier-2 ISP Tier-2 ISP Tier-2 ISP Tier-2 ISP local ISP local ISP local ISP local ISP local ISP Tier 3 ISP local ISP local ISP local ISP Local and tier- 3  ISPs are customers  of higher tier ISPs connecting them to  rest of Internet
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 Introduction 1-8
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 Introduction 1-9 Internet History 1961: Kleinrock - queueing theory  shows effectiveness of packet- switching 1964:   Baran - packet-switching in  military nets 1967:  ARPAnet conceived by  Advanced Research Projects  Agency 1969:  first ARPAnet node  operational 1972:   ARPAnet  public demonstration NCP (Network Control Protocol) first  host-host protocol  first e-mail program ARPAnet has 15 nodes 1961-1972: Early packet-switching principles
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 Introduction 1-10 Internet History 1970:  ALOHAnet satellite network in  Hawaii 1974: Cerf and Kahn - architecture for 
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