KD13 - Television and Children Learning Violence Sex...

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Television and Children: Learning, Violence, Sex
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CHILDREN: LEARNING, VIOLENCE & SEX Children in the United States watch an average of 3 to 5 hours of television every day. Kids who watch TV have less time for playing, reading, doing homework, and talking with other children and adults TV has been shown to affect both social and emotional behavior
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LEARNING FROM TV Children recall visual information more. TV reduces imagination and creativity. TV exposure may affect reading, perhaps by displacing books or time spent reading.
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Sesame Street (1969) 1. Increases vocabulary and pre-reading skill. 2. Positive social skills and increased ethnic tolerance. (children become more positive about children of other races; increases cultural pride among minority children) 3. Better school grades in English, math, science. 4. Effects are greater when combined with parental discussion .
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Programming for Children 1990 Children’s Television Act (clarified by the FCC in 1996) requires all television stations to provide at least 3 hours per week of educational and informational programming for children. Nickelodeon, Channel One, Disney “Kidvid” advertising—80% is concentrated on toys, cereal, candy, and snacks
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Understanding of Advertising 18 months-2 years : notices bright colors and begins to ask for advertised products 2-5 years : understand TV ads as literal and are vulnerable to appeals 5-8 years : more comprehension and begin to negotiate with parents to buy products that are advertised.
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