302-NYY Corporate Sentences

302-NYY Corporate Sentences - December 7, 2004 What...

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December 7, 2004 What Corporate America Can't Build: A Sentence By SAM DILLON BLOOMINGTON, Ill. - R. Craig Hogan, a former university professor who heads an online school for business writing here, received an anguished e-mail message recently from a prospective student. "i need help," said the message, which was devoid of punctuation. "i am writing a essay on writing i work for this company and my boss want me to help improve the workers writing skills can yall help me with some information thank you". Hundreds of inquiries from managers and executives seeking to improve their own or their workers' writing pop into Dr. Hogan's computer in-basket each month, he says, describing a number that has surged as e-mail has replaced the phone for much workplace communication. Millions of employees must write more frequently on the job than previously. And many are making a hash of it. "E-mail is a party to which English teachers have not been invited," Dr. Hogan said. "It has companies tearing their hair out." A recent survey of 120 American corporations reached a similar conclusion. The study, by the National Commission on Writing, a panel established by the College Board, concluded that a third of employees in the nation's blue-chip companies wrote poorly and that businesses were spending as much as $3.1 billion annually on remedial training. The problem shows up not only in e-mail but also in reports and other texts, the commission said. "It's not that companies want to hire Tolstoy," said Susan Traiman, a director at the Business Roundtable, an association of leading chief executives whose corporations were surveyed in the study. "But they need people who can write clearly, and many employees and applicants fall short of that standard." Millions of inscrutable e-mail messages are clogging corporate computers by setting off
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requests for clarification, and many of the requests, in turn, are also chaotically written, resulting in whole cycles of confusion. Here is one from a systems analyst to her supervisor at a high-tech corporation based in
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course ENGL 302 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at George Mason.

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302-NYY Corporate Sentences - December 7, 2004 What...

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