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lecture+13 - Lecture 13 Vegetables Vegetables Plants or...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 13 Vegetables Vegetables Plants or parts of plants which are used as food. Served raw or heated, they supply color, flavor, texture, and nutrients to the human diet. Primary nutrients in vegetables Vitamin A precursor (beta carotene), Vitamin C Minerals, other vitamins (folate) fiber Vegetable consumption appears to reduce cancer risk Appear to be the most often protective: Raw vegetables Allium vegetables (onions, garlic, red pepper) Carrots Green vegetables Cruciferous vegetables (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts) tomatoes The National Cancer Institute Recommends ½ c raw non-leafy or cooked vegetable 1 c raw leafy vegetable ½ c cooked dried peas or beans (legumes) 1 medium fruit or ½ c of cut fruit ¾ c of 100% juice ¼ c dried fruit Structure of Plant Cell Wall Fibrous Cellulose Found in greater proportion in rind or peel Pectic compounds Found between cells Hemicellulose Lignin – has texture of woods/ stocks of broccoli/ interior of carrot Vegetable gums Plant Tissue Structure Dermal tissue: outer covering, commonly called the peel or rind. Like the chaff or husk Usually not eaten without special preparation, i.e., orange marmalade (orange rind) Watermelon pickles (watermelon rind) Vascular system of plant Transport Carries water from roots to leaves Carries carbohydrates from site of production to site of storage. Sometimes eaten: Celery asparagus Parenchyma Cell Major food source of plant structure. Contains pulp, cytoplasm, organelles Structure of Parenchyma Cell Cell wall: Primary—loosely associated cellulose Secondary—condensed cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, gums Cytoplasm: sticky gel-like compound found within the cell wall. Surrounds and bathes the organelles (plastids) Types of Plastids Chloroplasts Contain chlorophyll Chromoplasts Contain carotinoid pigments Leucoplasts Location of starch storage Vacuole Stores water, anthocyanins, flavors, sugars, salts, and organic acids Turgor Term applied to describe the firmness of a cell based upon its water content Relates to juiciness (vs. dryness) Crunch or snap of raw vegetables Plastids Chloroplast Chromoplast Leucoplast Intercellular Space...
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course 709 201 taught by Professor Barbaratangel during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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lecture+13 - Lecture 13 Vegetables Vegetables Plants or...

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