Lecture+14

Lecture+14 - Lecture 14 Fruits, Salads, Purchase of Fresh,...

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Lecture 14 Fruits, Salads, Purchase of Fresh, Frozen and Canned Fruits and Vegetables
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Fruits Plant tissues used for food which develop from blossoms to become the ripened ovaries and adjacent tissues. A class of vegetable Classed separately from vegetables because of the following characteristics: Sweet Juiciness Fragrant and aromatic
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Classification of Fruits Simple – one flavor produces one fruit Develop from a single ovary or flower Citrus Drupes pomes Aggregate Develop from several ovaries in one flower Berries, specifically strawberries, raspberries and blackberries Multiple – one fruit being produced from several flowers Develop from a cluster of several flowers pineapple
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Unique Composition of Fruit Monosaccharide and disaccharide content Fructose (170) Glucose (70) Sucrose (100) – table sugar Shared with vegetables, to a degree Organic acids Phenolic compounds Pectic substances
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Composition of Fruit Primarily carbohydrate digestible indigestible Trace protein Trace fat except coconut (35%) avocado (17%) waste Waste can be as high as 40% due to peeling losses
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Aromatic Compounds found in Fruit Responsible for flavor Esters Aldehydes Alcohols—responsible for floral and fruity
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Changes which occur in fruits as it ripens Green color diminishes Carotinoid and flavone pigments develop Flesh softens Changes in pectic substances Acids develop Volatile and nonvolatile acids develop to create unique flavor Organic acids decrease Sourness decreases Monosaccharides increase sweetness
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Fruit Respiration Respiration occurs as the fruit grows, matures, and ripens Ethylene gas (C 2 H 4 ) is a ripening hormone produced by fruit cells during maturation Fruits which are harvested prior to full ripe may be stored in an atmosphere which contains ethylene gas to promote ripening
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Berries Soft flesh Multiple numerous seeds Characteristically external Strawberry Blueberry tomato
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Drupe Soft fruit surrounding a single center stone (pit) Plum Peach Cherry Olive
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acai
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Grapes cluster fruit Soft flesh Multiple seeds
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Lecture+14 - Lecture 14 Fruits, Salads, Purchase of Fresh,...

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