NOTES ON KANT

NOTES ON KANT - Kant: Does the Knowing Mind Shape the...

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Kant: Does the Knowing Mind Shape the World? Part 1 Who is right-the rationalists from Plato to Descartes, who argue that reason alone is the ultimate source of knowledge, or the empiricists, Locke and Hume, who argue that experience is the only source of knowledge? Are there innate ideas, as the rationalists contend, or are our minds completely blank at birth and need experience to write on them? Kant argued that the mind is so structured and empowered that it imposes interpretive categories on our experience, so that we do not simply experience the world, as the empiricists claimed, but interpret it through the categorizing mechanisms of the mind. Although our knowledge of the world is based on our sense experience, reason can attain knowledge of reality as we experience it. Both experience and reason play a role in knowing. Our senses reveal the tastes, smells, sounds, and shapes of objects. But our senses don’t reveal the relationship among objects, such as causal relationships among objects. This is called Kant’s Copernican revolution, for just as Copernicus showed that it was not the sun that revolved around the earth, but vice versa, that the earth revolved around the sun, likewise Kant showed that it was not the world that caused us to experience things the way we do but the categories of the mind that causes us to experience the world and everything else the way we do. Hume’s theory of causality : Cause-and-effect laws of science go beyond the evidence that scientists have for them. Scientists observe a few times that certain causes are followed by certain effects. They see several times, that when a moving object hits another, the second object moves. They conclude that those of kinds of causes will always be followed by the same effects in the future. But how do scientists know that the future will always be like the past? And how do scientists know that the phenomenon they see a few times will happen every time? Hume argued that scientists have no evidence for jumping from what they observe some times in the past to conclusions about what will happen every time in the future. Part 2
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NOTES ON KANT - Kant: Does the Knowing Mind Shape the...

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