Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Major Investigative Techniques I Surveillance a Observation of people and places by investigators to develop investigative

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Chapter 7: Major Investigative Techniques I. Surveillance a. Observation of people and places by investigators to develop investigative leads b. The basic objectives is to bring an investigation into a sharp focus c. Visual Surveillance i. Keeping watch on a particular suspect, vehicle, or place ii. Fixed visual surveillance 1. Also called a stakeout 2. Located within a building, if possible, with observations made through available windows or doors iii. Moving Visual Surveillance 1. A tail (shadow) iv. Bumper Beeper 1. A device that electronically signals the location of automobiles, or other objects to which it is affixed 2. U.S. v. Knotts (1983) a. Noted that the scientific enhancement of the beeper raised no constitutional issues that would not be raised by visual surveillance v. Global Positioning Device (GPS) d. Audio Surveillance i. Wiretapping and electronic eavesdropping are the primary forms of audio surveillance by listening ii. Bugging 1. Places or people may be wired for sound
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iii. Dalia v. United States (1979) 1. 4 th amendment does not prohibit entry by officials to install eavesdropping devices iv. Katz v. U.S. (1967) 1. Search warrant is required to conduct eavesdropping 2. Eavesdropping may properly be conducted under court supervision similar to procedures now available to police in securing search warrants and warrants for arrest v. Consensual electronic surveillance 1. Also known as participant monitoring 2. Its primary use is to secure a record of a conversation in which the person wired for sound is a participant 3. Undercover police agents and cooperative informants, such as accomplice witnesses, can provide police with a record of conversations in which they participated. 4.
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2011 for the course CRJU 4110 taught by Professor Sandrablount during the Fall '10 term at Georgia State University, Atlanta.

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Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Major Investigative Techniques I Surveillance a Observation of people and places by investigators to develop investigative

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