Muslim and Christian Relations in Southeast Asia

Muslim and Christian Relations in Southeast Asia -...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style  1/27/11 By: Shaan Baig Ashley Slovinski Muslim and Christian Relations in  Southeast Asia
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 1/27/11 Philippines
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 1/27/11 Mindanao Three main cultural groups: Lumad Bangsamoro Christian migrant settlers Christian migrants given preferential  treatment by government Muslim population decreased from 90% to  20%
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 1/27/11 Commission on National Integration Recommended by 1954 Congress committee to better  integrate Muslims  Authorized the implementation of various  development programs Only program that received substantial funding was a  scholarship program Many more non-elite Muslims were able to attend  universities in Manila Students experienced discrimination first hand Many students became politically active on campuses
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 1/27/11 Beginning of Separatist Movements 1965 – Election of President  Ferdinand Marcos Increased antagonism towards Muslims  by state 1968 – Jabidah Massacre Politically ignited the Muslim student  community Formation of several separatist  movements Muslim Nationalist League Muslim Independence Movement
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 1/27/11 Violence in Cotabato 1970s – wave of violence between Christians and  Muslims Mostly attacks on Muslims by Christians By end of 1971 - 100,000 refugees from Mindanao  forced from home communities by violence Lack of state response to attacks on Muslims Gave Muslims impression of a “genocidal” state policy Led to an armed separatist movement by ordinary  Muslims
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2011 for the course ANTH 218 taught by Professor Adams during the Spring '10 term at Loyola Chicago.

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Muslim and Christian Relations in Southeast Asia -...

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