SOC 344 ECONOMY WORK and the FAMILY F 08

SOC 344 ECONOMY WORK and the FAMILY F 08 - Soc 344 Click to...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Soc 344 THE ECONOMY, WORK, and the FAMILY
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WORK and the ECONOMY The institution of work and the economy is perhaps the most fundamental in creating and maintaining inequalities. Changes in the economy have greater impact on all other social institutions, particularly the family. These changes affect people in unequal ways; it privilege some and oppress others. It may also provide opportunities for social change.
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Distribution of Income in the United States Mean Household Income : $145,970 66,839 42,629 25,468 10,136
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U.S. Family Income, 2001  
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Median Income, U.S. Families, 1950-2001
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Distribution of Wealth in the United States
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Macroeconomic Changes: Unequal Income Distribution The rich are getting richer. The top 1% of households has nearly 1/3 of the wealth. The middle class is shrinking. Definitions of middle class are changing. The working class is barely surviving. Distribution of Household Income, 1976-2001
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OUTCOMES OF INEQUALITY Life Expectancy Health and Illness Comfort and Needs Well-Being and Happiness Sense of Self Justice and Ethics Social Responsibility and Democracy
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Overworked, Time Poor, and Abandoned by Uncle Sam Janet C. Gornick “The American Model” of Overworked Parents: The American state provides much less to working parents than do many other countries, especially high-income countries of northern and western Europe. In the US, the main responsibility of coordinating the demands of employment and children’s care and supervision is placed almost entirely on the individual, without much institutional help. Compared to Europe : European countries offer parents multiple forms of paid family leave, high-quality affordable child care, limit long weekly hours, benefits for part-time workers, flexible working hours, universal health insurance, and other benefits. Private Solutions : both parents working, reducing working hours of one partner (usually the mother), part-time employment, underemployment, rearrange employment schedules, split-shift parents, less leisure time, and placing children in child care. Children : In comparison to other rich countries, American children are much more likely to be poor, to die in infancy or young adulthood, to perform poor in school, and to bear children as teenagers. Explanations
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2011 for the course SOC 344 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Michigan.

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SOC 344 ECONOMY WORK and the FAMILY F 08 - Soc 344 Click to...

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