Soc 344 Parenting _ Childhood 3 F 08

Soc 344 Parenting _ Childhood 3 F 08 - Soc 344 Click to...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 1/30/11 Soc 344 PARENTING & CHILDHOOD: KEY ISSUES AROUND CHILDREN & FAMILY
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1/30/11 Questions Should we advertise to children? Is it fair to advertise to children when they do not fully understand the intent of the advertisers? And when they do? Should children be encouraged to buy products that they do not really need or that they are harmful to them? Does advertising on TV have an impact on family life? What is the impact of TV ads on children? Consumers? Violence? Addictions? Obesity? Prejudice? Have ads for toys the same impact as ads for food products? Ads for products versus ads for lifestyles?
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1/30/11 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0618463518/ref=s9cpic_c1_img3-rfc_p-3237_g1? pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center- 3&pf_rd_r=0B417FYTQ9WPGGHB4YM4&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=463383391&pf_rd_i=507846
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1/30/11 THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF CHILDHOOD Raises the necessity of community involvement in child-rearing for children’s experiences are experienced beyond the family—in the neighborhoods, schools, media, and the larger society. It is not acceptable to that parents should bear the sole responsibility from protecting children from corporate marketing and that parents should bear the blame for the consequences of commercialism. The culture of marketing competes with parents’ values and efforts to educate children. Such competition is unfair and unequal and therefore it should not be allowed.
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1/30/11 ADVERTISING TO CHILDREN ON TV In the US, children 12 years or younger controlled the spending of $28 billion in 2000; they influenced family purchases of $250 billion. Children in the US watch more than 40,000 TV ads per year; ten minutes per 1 hour of TV programming. About three quarters of all children aged 11 to 14 have a TV set in their rooms. Children ads fell into four main categories: toys, cereals, candies and fast-food restaurants.
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1/30/11 The Nature of Food Ads Food ads promote a high-fat, low- fiber diet, a child’s typical meal consisting of a cheese burger, french fries, a fizzy drink, and a toy. Food ads present a complex story conveying messages about when , where, and with whom should the child eat. The most common themes of food ads are violence, conflict, achievement, mood alteration, enablement, trickery, and product dependence.
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1/30/11 Techniques used on Children’s TV Ads 1. Exaggeration : use of images and language that exaggerates products benefits and hides harms. Use of words like ‘best,’ better’, ‘part of a balanced diet.’ 1. Fantasy : children have difficulty distinguishing what is real from what is fantasy. Fantasy attracts children’s attention. 9/10 cereal messages use fantasy. Products are made part of a fantasy world that a child can only enter by purchase.
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