SOC 344 SINGLE COHABITATION MARRIAGE 1

SOC 344 SINGLE COHABITATION MARRIAGE 1 - SOC 344 Click to...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style SOC 344 SINGLEHOOD, COHABITATION and MARRIAGE
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The Single Option Singlehood : being single means more than simply being not married. It can be freely chosen or unintentional as well as enduring or short-term. Singleness is a unique state of being and not just a holding pattern between relationships. Data : a new survey has shown that traditional marriage has ceased to be the preferred living arrangement in the majority of US households.
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Not Married : The findings indicated that marriage did not figure in nearly 55.8 million American family households, or 50.2 percent. Married : By comparison, the number of traditional households with married couples at their core stood at slightly more than 55.2 million, or 49.8 percent of the total. Trends : The trend represented a dramatic change from just six years ago, when married couples made up 52 percent of 105.5 million American households http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20061015/ts_alt_afp/afplifestyleussociet DATA
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Who are they?: 14 million + of them were headed by single women, 5 million headed by single men, 36.7 million belonged to a category described as "nonfamily households," a term that experts said referred primarily to gay or heterosexual couples cohabiting out of formal wedlock. Living Alone : In addition, there were more than 30 million unmarried men and women living alone, who are not categorized as families, the Census Bureau reported. http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20061015/ts_alt_afp/afplifestyleussociet
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LIVING ALONE Living Alone : More than one of four Americans is living alone. In 2000, adults lived alone in 26 percent of the 105 million households. Unmarried Adults : The number of unmarried adults (never married, divorced, and widowed) has increased from 37.5 million in 1970 to 81.7 million in 2000. Never-married: make up the largest and fastest-growing segment of the unmarried population. The proportion of adults who have never been married rose from 15 percent in 1972 to 24 percent in 2000. Living Alone : The proportion of 25 to 44 living alone increased from 3 percent in 1970 to 10 percent in 2002. SOURCES: Saluter, 1996; Fields and Casper, 2001; U.S. Census Bureau, 2002; Simmons and O'Connell,
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Gender: More women (15 percent) than men (11 percent) live alone. Age: Across all age groups, older Americans are the most likely to live alone: about 31 percent in 2002. Race: More than 80 percent are white
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Age of Marriage
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Myths and Realities about Singles Singles are tied to their mother's apron strings . In reality, there are few differences between singles and married in their perceptions of and relationships with parents or other relatives. Singles are selfish and self-centered
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2011 for the course SOC 344 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Michigan.

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SOC 344 SINGLE COHABITATION MARRIAGE 1 - SOC 344 Click to...

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