SOC 344 DATING 2 F 08-1

SOC 344 DATING 2 F 08-1 - SOC 344 DATING 2 MARRIAGE MARKETS...

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SOC 344 DATING 2
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MARRIAGE MARKETS
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D = f { market conditions, pool of eligibles, mate traits } Pe = f { marriage squeeze, marriage gradient, race, class, age, religion, sex, gender, sexuality } Mt = f { propinquity, family/peer pressure, attraction, companionship }
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Markets Types 1. COERCIVE 1. CLOSED 1. OPEN 1. LIMITED OPEN 1. DUAL
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DATING THEORIES FILTER THEORY PERMANENT AVAILABILITY SOCIAL EXCHANGE EQUITY THEORY
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1. FILTER THEORY: Narrowing the Marriage Market Filter theory : most of us narrow our pool of prospective partners by selecting people we see on a regular basis, who are most similar to us in terms of variables such proximity, physical appearance, as well as age, race, values, social class, and sexual orientation. Homogamy : refers to dating or marrying someone with similar social characteristics such as ethnicity and age.
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“Halo Effect” “Halo effect“: people who are considered beautiful are assumed to possess other desirable social characteristics as well, such as warmth, sexual responsiveness, kindness, strength, modesty, sensitivity, poise, sociability, and good character. They are also seen as likely to have more prestige, happier marriages, more social and professional success, and more fulfilling lives. The “Halo Effect” also applies to race, gender, ability, sexuality, etc…
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“Demonizing Effect” Often, people who belong to subordinated social groups are assumed to posses undesirable personality and social traits, such as untrustworthy, violent, dishonest, dangerous, criminal, pathological, irresponsible, etc. Such negative characteristics are used to justify their subordination and the need to further monitoring, regulating, excluding, and exploiting of these individuals. People from other social groups who associate with them run the risk of lowering their social status, becoming suspicious of disloyalty, and of undermining sexual, family, and national values.
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“Marriage Squeeze” Marriage Squeeze : refer to the situation an individual from a particular social group (ex.: women) may have difficulties finding a mate because her/his pool of eligibles has been reduced due to demographic and or social factors. Potential partners may be unavailable because of situations out of their control, as a result of social forces which prevent them from becoming available to those who desire them.
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Expanding the Marriage Market The Permanent Availability Model: adults are constantly expanding and adding to their pool of available mates by crossing over social boundaries and engaging in dating with people similar and different from their own. Hetero-gamy:
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2011 for the course SOC 344 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Michigan.

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SOC 344 DATING 2 F 08-1 - SOC 344 DATING 2 MARRIAGE MARKETS...

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