SOC 344 LOVE THEORIES 2 F 08

SOC 344 LOVE THEORIES 2 F 08 - SOC 344 Click to edit Master...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style SOC 344 PERSPECTIVES ON LOVE
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Body images Ideal of Beauty Desire, Hunger, Pain, Joy Sex Sexuality Gender notions Erotic Expectations Performance Commitments Trust Diversity Conceptions of Self Self worth Love
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Introduction Love and History : love conceptions, values, and behaviors have changed over time. The modern idea of Romantic Love has its roots in medieval courtly love and has been reshaped by social forces to fit present cultural norms and institutions. Love and Culture : love has been and is experienced differently in different cultural settings. Conceptions of love in the West may differ from the experience of love in other cultures and societies. Love and Diversity : diverse groups within our society may experience love differently from mainstream groups, whether we are referring to diverse gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnic, disability, age, or class groups in society.
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Love and Capitalism Eva Illouz Love as Ritual : modern romantic practices resemble the codified sequence of actions we call ‘rituals’. Those rituals demarcate the Temporal, Spatial, Artifactual, and Emotional boundaries of love. “Staged Reality : the ritual of love help isolate the lovers and their emotions from all others by acting in special ways, moving to romantic spaces, consuming particular objects, and heightening their emotions and passions. Consuming Romance : capitalist development has associated love with the required consumption of objects whether gastronomic, cultural, or touristic as a ritual to express and recreate love. That is, romantic encounters could be predicated on the direct or indirect purchase of an object for the love experience to be felt and acted upon.
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PERSPECTIVES ON LOVE Evolutionary Bio-chemistry Attachment Theory of Love Types of Loving Exchange Love Wheel Theory of Love Triangular Theory of Love
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EVOLUTIONARY BIO-CHEMISTRY Biological perspectives maintain that love is grounded in evolution, biology, and chemistry. Biologists and some psychologists see romance as serving the evolutionary purpose of drawing men and women into long-term partnerships that are essential to reproduction and child rearing. When lovers claim that they feel "high" and as if they are being swept away, it's probably because they are flooded by chemicals . A meeting of eyes, a touch of hands, or a whiff of scent sets off a flood that starts in the brain and races along the nerves and through the bloodstream. The results are familiar: flushed skin, sweaty palms, and heavy breathing. Natural amphetamines such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and phenylethylamine (PEA) are responsible for these symptoms. PEA is especially effective; it revs up the brain, causing feelings of elation, exhilaration, and euphoria. As infatuation wanes and attachment grows, another group
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SOC 344 LOVE THEORIES 2 F 08 - SOC 344 Click to edit Master...

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