SOC 344 LOVE THEORIES 11 F 08

SOC 344 LOVE THEORIES 11 F 08 - Click to edit Master...

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style SOC 344 PERSPECTIVES ON LOVE Body images Ideal of Beauty Desire, Hunger, Pain, Joy Sex Sexuality Gender notions Erotic Expectations Performance Commitments Trust Diversity Conceptions of Self Self worth Love Introduction Love and History : love conceptions, values, and behaviors have changed over time. The modern idea of Romantic Love has its roots in medieval courtly love and has been reshaped by social forces to fit present cultural norms and institutions. Love and Culture : love has been and is experienced differently in different cultural settings. Conceptions of love in the West may differ from the experience of love in other cultures and societies. Love and Diversity : diverse groups within our society may experience love differently from mainstream groups, whether we are referring to diverse gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnic, disability, age, or class groups in society. Love and Capitalism Eva Illouz Love as Ritual : modern romantic practices resemble the codified sequence of actions we call rituals. Those rituals demarcate the Temporal, Spatial, Artifactual, and Emotional boundaries of love. Staged Reality : the ritual of love help isolate the lovers and their emotions from all others by acting in special ways, moving to romantic spaces, consuming particular objects, and heightening their emotions and passions. Consuming Romance : capitalist development has associated love with the required consumption of objects whether gastronomic, cultural, or touristic as a ritual to express and recreate love. That is, romantic encounters could be predicated on the direct or indirect purchase of an object for the love experience to be felt and acted upon. LOVE Caring: wanting to help the other by providing aid and emotional support, as valuing your partner's welfare as much as your own, caring means responding to the other person's needs. Intimacy: feelings of closeness, such as: Share a mutual emotional interest Have some sort of history together Are mutually interdependent Have a distinct sense of identity as a couple Hold a reciprocal commitment to a continued relationship Share hopes and dreams for a common future Self-disclosure: refers to open communication in which one person reveals his or her honest thoughts and feelings to another person with the expectation that truly open communication will follow. In intimate relationships, people feel free to expose their weaknesses, idiosyncrasies, hopes, and insecurities without fear of ridicule or rejection. Commitment: is a person's intention to remain in a relationship "through thick and thin." Source of commitment : (1) a sense of loyalty and fidelity to one's partner; (2) a religious, legal, or moral belief in the sanctity of the marriage; (3) a continued optimism about future rewards emotional, financial, sexual, or otherwise; and (4) strong emotional attachments, dependence, and love Functions of Love and Loving...
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SOC 344 LOVE THEORIES 11 F 08 - Click to edit Master...

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