Ch 18 PPT - Evidence-based Programs for At-Risk Youth and...

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Evidence-based Programs for At-Risk Youth and Juvenile Offenders: A Review of Proven Prevention and Intervention Models Chapter 18
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Overview What are “Evidence-Based Programs” Blueprints Model Programs: The “Gold Standard” Evidence-Based Programs Prevention Programs Community-Based Interventions Functional Family Therapy Multi-Systemic Therapy Less Effective Efforts
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Overview Prevention Programs (cont) Out-of-home Settings Multidimensional Treatment Foster Case What’s the catch? What are the barriers to “scaling up” of evidence- based programs? A Road Map for Implementation
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Introduction Death of Martin Lee Anderson Marine-style boot camp in Florida Disproportionate Minority Confinement (DMC) Reasons for delinquency prevention Drug use and dependency, adult criminality, school drop-out, injury, early pregnancy, and death
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Introduction Many strategies today Deleterious and sometimes fatal consequences Most adult criminals began offending as juveniles Preventing delinquency is preventing adult crime The costs associated with offenders has been the fastest growing part of most state budgets Evidence-based programs could produce savings 5 to 10 times the cost
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Title Cost-benefit WSIPP estimates that by doubling investment in high quality programs, additional prison capacity could be eliminated Popular programs in the 1990s were not effective and increased delinquency D.A.R.E., Scared Straight, Boot Camps, or “get tough” strategies
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Introduction Risk factors and interventions Genetic risk factors are difficult to change Dynamic risk factors can be changed more easily: parenting, school involvement, peer group association, and skills deficits About a dozen “proven” program models About 20 “promising” programs Programs with little to no evidence continue to receive funding
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Historically Causes of delinquency were thought to be from the home, neighborhood, or from lack of socializing experiences, job opportunities, or from the labeling effects Interventions methods promoted by these theories turned out to be unhelpful
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Ch 18 PPT - Evidence-based Programs for At-Risk Youth and...

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