miniproject5 - 12 months for personal reasons, and 30...

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Mini-project 5 1. The 2002 New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey showed a total of 59,324 rent-controlled housing units and 236,263 rent-stabilized units built in 1947 or later. For these rental units, the probability distributions for the number of persons living in the unit are given. Number of Persons Rent-Controlled Rent-Stabilized 1 0.61 0.41 2 0.27 0.30 3 0.07 0.14 4 0.04 0.11 5 0.01 0.03 6 0.00 0.01 (a) What is the expected value of the number of persons living in rent- controlled units? (b) What is the expected value of the number of persons living in rent- stabilized units? (c) What is the variance of the number of persons living in rent-controlled units? (d) What is the variance of the number of persons living in rent-stabilized units? (e) How do the number of persons living in rent-controlled and rent- stabilized units compare? 2. A survey of 100 magazine subscribers showed that 46 rented a car during the past 12 months for business reasons, 59 rented a car during the past
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Unformatted text preview: 12 months for personal reasons, and 30 rented a car during the past 12 months for both business and personal reasons. (a) What is the probability that a subscriber rented a car for business reasons? (b) What is the probability that a subscriber rented a car for personal reasons? 1 (c) What is the probability that a subscriber rented a car during the past 12 months for business or personal reasons? (d) What is the probability that a subscriber did not rent a car during the past 12 months for either business or personal reasons? 3. Suppose there are 10 applicants for a job with 3 openings (all job open-ings are exactly the same). How many ways could you choose the 3 applicants who receive the jobs? (Hint: Is order important?) 4. Suppose there are 10 applicants for 3 different jobs. How many ways could you choose the 3 applicants who receive the jobs? (Hint: Is order important?) 2...
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This note was uploaded on 01/24/2011 for the course STATISTICS 19897 taught by Professor Jager,abigaill during the Fall '10 term at Kansas State University.

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miniproject5 - 12 months for personal reasons, and 30...

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