Dweck ppt from Schoolnet

Dweck ppt from Schoolnet - (StanfordUniversity)...

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Carol Dweck  (Stanford University) How do people’s beliefs influences their motivation and subsequent achievement in academic contexts?
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Focus on one type of belief: Student “theories” about intelligence
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  Dweck’s research indicates that  people tend to develop two  different concepts of ability/  intelligence — an  entity  view or  an  incremental  view
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Entity or fixed intelligence  view: Intelligence/ability is a fixed or  stable trait, and unevenly  distributed among individuals You-either-have-it-or-you-don’t and  “it” can be accurately judged by  others  and  “it” can’t be improved or  increased much
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Intelligence is fixed  implications: Student’s goal: to perform well and  look smart, even if sacrificing  learning (since negative  evaluations are signs that I am not  smart enough to succeed and  there’s only a fixed amount of  smartness).
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Intelligence is fixed  implications: If confident in abilities, student will seek  opportunities to demonstrate it  (although won’t always risk a lot). If not confident in abilities, student will  avoid situations with potential negative  feedback   thus tending to avoid  challenges and minimize intellectual  risks.
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Intelligence is fixed  implications: So the less confident will choose either  very easy or very difficult tasks so that  failure is not necessarily attributable to  low ability (i.e., “I’m stupid and there’s  nothing I can do about it”).  In addition, high effort or need to study  often thought of as reflective of low  intelligence
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Intelligence is fixed  implications: Strategy after difficulty   less  effort, act bored, procrastinate If I hardly study and still do well,  then I’m really smart If I don’t do well, then, after all, I  didn’t really try (self-handicapping)
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Intelligence is fixed  implications: Failure often results in “Why  bother? I’m just not smart enough  to do any better.” “Only a few students can get top 
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PSYCH 100 taught by Professor Ryan during the Fall '08 term at CUNY Hunter.

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Dweck ppt from Schoolnet - (StanfordUniversity)...

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