TravelingWaves

TravelingWaves - WAVES TRAVELING AND STANDING Apparatus...

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WAVES – TRAVELING AND STANDING Apparatus Springs, slinkies, string, stopwatch, meter stick, tapes. Note: The written work you turn in must include concise responses to all the questions asked or hinted at in the following procedural directions, but cannot consist solely of answers to these questions. Not only must it include a description of what you actually did and the resulting data , it must stand alone without a need for reference to these sheets. Where appropriate, use sketches or diagrams for clarity. Try to explain any apparent inconsistencies. When appropriate, comment on the experimental errors or experimental limits, etc. Investigating Traveling Wave Characteristics For these beginning activities dealing with traveling waves, we will use single pulses rather than trying for a continuous wave. The fundamental aspects of the pulses and the continuous wave are identical, but it is much easier to monitor the behavior of the individual pulses. Investigate a pulse made by compressing and releasing one end of a slinky. While your partner holds one end of a slinky—a long “soft” coil spring—on a smooth floor, pull on the other end until the slinky is stretched about six meters. Do not let go while the slinky is stretched or the coils may become inextricably intertwined! While maintaining your firm grip on the end with one hand, with your other hand, grab the slinky about a meter from the end and pull to compress this meter length of slinky at the end. Then release the compressed section of slinky and watch. Observe the pulse that travels along the slinky. What type of pulse (wave) is it? How is this type of pulse characterized? Investigate a pulse made by moving one end of the slinky to one side and back. While your partner maintains a firm grip at the far end, move your hand sideways to one side and immediately back to the original position to produce another type of pulse. Practice until you make pulses that travel down only one side of the slinky. What type of pulse (wave) is it? How is this type of pulse characterized? Look at the pulse as it moves along the slinky. (i) Does the shape change? If so, in what way? (ii) Does the size change? If so, in what way? (iii) Does the speed change? If so, in what way? Make Observations (i) Make quantitative observations (i.e. make measurements) of the parameters you need to know in order to support your answers to the questions. If you are looking for changes, you may need to determine the speed in different regions in the slinky, e.g. separate halves. (ii)
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHYS 212 taught by Professor Aaronsup during the Spring '10 term at Boise State.

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TravelingWaves - WAVES TRAVELING AND STANDING Apparatus...

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