engl101_4 - C.J. Gorrell September 22, 2008 No Child Left...

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C.J. Gorrell September 22, 2008 No Child Left Behind, or Every Child Left Behind? In an attempt to improve the standards of education in the U.S., the Bush administration formulated the No Child Left Behind Act. The act is a system of standardized tests, and pre-designed curriculums for academic classes that every student in America must take and pass. While this may sound like a simple system that will force schools to ensure students get a set amount of education before they graduate, it in fact falls short of its goals, by making a classroom that denotes successful learning, and promotes a monotonous colorless work environment. The expected end result of the No Child Left Behind Act is for students to have the knowledge to pass all the standardized tests, in each academic subject. Teachers are given a set curriculum that covers everything the students are expected to know for the tests. The problem I have seen with this is that teachers teach students too pass the test. Everything done in the classroom is based on the format of these tests. While this may make the test in the end seem easier, if any variation in the way questions are worded, or if another format is used, students falter in their ability to find a solution. I personally,
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This note was uploaded on 01/24/2011 for the course ENGL ENGL101 taught by Professor Esprit during the Spring '09 term at Maryland.

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engl101_4 - C.J. Gorrell September 22, 2008 No Child Left...

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