journallarc - B efor e Aft er LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE...

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Before After LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL C.J. Gorrell Spring 2010
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On a recent trip, I visited the Glen Canyon dam in Arizona. This dam can be considered as an example of the violation of the want to be of the land. This dam flooded the natural environment of Glen Canyon that is home to the Colorado River. The dam ruined miles and miles of natural habitat. The argument for violating the want to be of the land is the dam provides energy for the surrounding towns, and millions of gallons of water irrigation and urban areas. Lake Powell also provides an excellent recreational area for all water sport activities. The altered environment has been a sacrifice but the value may out weigh the costs in this situation. The Canyon was lost, but now millions of acres of land can now be made habitable for human use, and the river brings a great deal of money into the area through tourism.
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On a visit to Arizona I got to see the Montezuma castle of the pueblo Indians. This castle may be the finest example of finding a balance of the man made with the natural landscape. The clay castle uses the rock face to keep the clay fortress cool in the day and warm at night. It also provided the villagers with protection from natural predators. Little damage was made to the surrounding landscape, and the clay structure provides excellent Shan Shui. The colors bring balance to the structure and surrounding rock face while the geometric form provides a pleasing contrast. Also the simple square structure style of the fortress stands out nicely from the unorganized rock face. I more dynamic design may have seemed to edgy and out of place. This probably allowed for those near the fortress to easily identify it while those further away, such as possible enemies, to not be able to spot it as easily.
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Lake Jenny in the Grand Tetons while largely an untouched environment in regards to the built environment, it is one of my favorite examples in which
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landscape should be viewed in Meining’s definition of nature. The Lake itself is the most perfectly preserved lake in the country. One can see the bottom of the lake in areas as much as 30 feet deep. The rangers of this park are considered the most active and aggressive in their acts of preservation. They do whatever is possible to minimize construction in the park, as well as maintain a high state of cleanliness throughout the park. If you were to visit this park it is easy to see why they are this way, and you would be thankful that they are the way they are. The majority of construction involves the paths. These paths were chosen and made in such a way as to minimize environmental impact, with especially concern for erosion as the majority of the park rests along the side of a mountain in the Tetons. The image above of the waterfall is one of the highlights of the park. The path system circulates the waterfall so that one can hear the rush of the water during the majority of the circulatory hike of the park, but can’t see it. This builds up the
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journallarc - B efor e Aft er LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE...

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