History notes 1/27 - Eight Hours for What We Will:...

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“Eight Hours for What We Will”: Unionization and the Labor Movement I. Working Conditions in U.S. Factories, c. late 19 th century - 2/3 of Americans working wage jobs - Company’s influence continued after work - Housing, food, clothing, police, and church were all controlled by the company (especially with coal mining) - Sometimes paid in Scrip, gift card for company store 1) Sanitation – bad - “The Jungle” meat industry, inspired legislation - Dangerous work, no safety regulations - Triangle Shirtwaist fire, factory caught on fire, workers were locked in 2) Working hours – long -Shifts normally 10-16 hours, no breaks -6 days a week 3) Work style – regimented, repetitive, “on the clock” - Machine sets pace for labor i) Taylorism – scientific management system for labor - Frederic Taylor: efficiency expert - Treating humans like robots 4) “Deskilling” of labor -People used to be artisans, now just workers -Now workers only know how to do 1 portion of the job - Lower quality products
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course HIST 2112 taught by Professor Sutter during the Spring '07 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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History notes 1/27 - Eight Hours for What We Will:...

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