Lecture Summary 8

Lecture Summary 8 - Please be sure that you review your...

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Please be sure that you review your notes on a regular basis. This material is more difficult than material that was on the first exam. The positions of emission lines and absorption lines are placed at the same wavelength in the spectrum given the same gas. The wavelength is the same, but the line appears bright in emission and dark in absorption. Atomic structure models are used to account for the composition link. The origin of spectral lines was explained using the Bohr atomic model and the transitions of electrons between energy levels in the atom. Some lines due to hydrogen lie in the visible portion of the spectrum. Emission lines of hydrogen and other atoms were studied in Lab #7. It is the H alpha emission that gives the reddish tint to nebulae that contain hydrogen. See the lecture handout on Origin of Spectral Lines. Observations of our nearest star, the Sun, begin with the photosphere. Scans of the solar spectrum have revealed the composition of the Sun and the temperature of the photosphere. Spectra of other stars can also provide information on their composition and temperatures.
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2011 for the course ASTR 101 taught by Professor Deming during the Spring '07 term at Maryland.

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Lecture Summary 8 - Please be sure that you review your...

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