Chapter10 Routing Textbook

Chapter10 Routing Textbook - Link-State Routing Protocols...

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© 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 1 Version 4.0 Link-State Routing Protocols Routing Protocols and Concepts – Chapter 10
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2 © 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public Objectives Describe the basic features & concepts of link-state routing protocols. List the benefits and requirements of link-state routing protocols.
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3 © 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public Introduction
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4 © 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public Link-State Routing Link state routing protocols Also known as shortest path first algorithms These protocols built around Dijkstra’s SPF
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5 © 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public Link-State Routing Dikjstra’s algorithm also known as the shortest path first (SPF) algorithm
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6 © 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public Link-State Routing The shortest path to a destination is not necessarily the path with the least number of hops
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7 © 2007 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public Link-State Routing Link-State Routing Process How routers using Link State Routing Protocols reach convergence Each routers learns about its own directly connected networks Link state routers exchange hello packet to “meet” other directly Connected link state routers Each router builds its own Link State Packet (LSP) which includes information about neighbors such as neighbor ID, After the LSP is created the router floods it to all neighbors who then store the information and then forward it until all routers have the same information Once all the routers have received all the LSPs, the routers then construct a topological map of the network which is used to determine the best routes to a destination
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Chapter10 Routing Textbook - Link-State Routing Protocols...

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