feb_05.docx - Introduction One of the most commonly...

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Introduction One of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world, second after water Biggest tea consumers; spread all over the place China produced mostly in Asia and South America Unit 2 --Rise of tea in China --spread in East Asia, Russia, Islamic World --Via Europeans to the Globe --intersection with Sugar in late 1600s onward (mainly European—esp. English) --Story of tea and sugar is a story high highs and low lows. Tea; wellbeing, power, achievement Sugar; pleasure, profit, empowerment Lows; people who had to make the products; slave labour, miserable labour, shorten lives --First Reading Hoh and Mair, The True History of Tea , Chapter 13 Survey of tea’s transfer into European economy and culture. First encounters with tea and how it became important to Europe. Don’t focus on names, but rather than story. Pay attention to WHEN, HOW (they became interested), and IMPACT Tea in China What is tea; vague Tea; what it is depends on the region you are in Steeping of something hot Black, green, herbal, steeped brew, iced? -- Camellia sinensis: Tea plant that is responsible for producing all varieties of tea. Differentiated by what you do after you pick it Some variations, but all traced back to this plant. Origins? Hot debate; most experts agree that camellia sinensis appeared in a small place Sichuan, Myanmar, Yunnan. Over millennia, the tea plant adjusted to climates and moved to new areas. Outside of confined region of evolution, moved by human effort. First from trees, modified to stay in small sized bushes to get new leaves (hedges) Tea (English) and cha(i), China; two words used today to refer to tea Two words either because of different pronunciation or spelling.

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